Photokina 2014 highlights

1 terabyte portable storage solution

By

July 1, 2007

miniStack v3

miniStack v3

Image Gallery (3 images)

July 2, 2007 The advent of data hungry formats like digital video demand big, fast, practical storage solutions and this latest release from Newer Technology fits the bill. Designed for audio/video editing, digital photography, MP3 libraries and high-speed back up, the miniStack v3 is a quad interface storage device offering transfer rates of up to 150 Megabytes per second and a capacity of up to 1 terabyte (1000GB) – enough for 350,000 MP3 songs.

The miniStack v3 features rear and side port configuration of one eSATA, two FireWire 800, one FireWire 400, and three USB 2.0 ports for simultaneous connection of multiple digital accessories and is suitable for Plug and Play use with Mac or PC.

The 1TB device can hold 350,000 MP3 songs at 2.85MB per song, up to 1 million photos (1MB per 2.4 mega pixel JPEG photo) or 76 hours of uncompressed digital video (13GB/hour data rate).

Seven Models Up To 1.0TB are available ranging in price from US$169.99 (160GB) to US$549.99 (1TB)

miniStack v3 specs:
  • Up to 1.0TB (1,000GB) of bootable disk capacity
  • Up to 32MB of data cache
  • Oxford OXUF924DSb bridge chipset with Native Command Queuing (NCQ)
  • 6.5" x 6.5" x 1.5" size
  • One eSATA port (rear)
  • Two FireWire 800 (1394b) 9 pin ports (rear)
  • One FireWire 400 (1394a) 6 pin port (side)
  • Three USB 2.0/1.1 ports (2 rear, 1 side)
  • External AutoSwitching 100~240v 50/60Hz 3 amp UL listed power adapter
  • Auto-Power on/off automatically with computer
  • Intelligent thermal monitoring for minimal fan power consumption and quiet operation
  • 36" FireWire 800 connecting cable, 12" FireWire 800-400 interconnecting cable and 36" USB 2.0/1.1 connecting cable
  • About the Author
    Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
    Tags
    Related Articles
    Looking for something? Search our 28,552 articles