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Study shows finger length can predict SAT scores

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May 29, 2007

Our editor's hand - according to this study, he was probably pretty bad at maths!

Our editor's hand - according to this study, he was probably pretty bad at maths!

May 30, 2007 Were you born to be better at math or literacy skills? Take a look at the difference in length between your index and ring fingers - a new study shows that boys with a higher ratio of ring finger to index finger length have a tendency to perform better at math, while girls with a lower ring finger to index finger ratio tend to perform better in literacy tests. Take a look at our Editor's hand here; he's not too happy about these findings!

The results of numeracy and literacy tests for seven-year-old children can be predicted by measuring the length of their fingers, shows new research.

In a study to be published in the British Journal of Psychology, scientists compared the finger lengths of 75 children with their Standardised Assessment Test (SAT) scores.

They found a clear link between a child’s performance in numeracy and literacy tests and the relative lengths of their index (pointing) and ring fingers.

Scientists believe that the link is caused by different levels of the hormones testosterone and oestrogen in the womb – and the effect they have on both brain development and finger length.

“Testosterone has been argued to promote development of the areas of the brain which are often associated with spatial and mathematical skills,” said Dr Mark Brosnan, Head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Bath, who led the study.

“Oestrogen is thought to do the same in the areas of the brain which are often associated with verbal ability.

“Interestingly, these hormones are also thought have a say in the relative lengths of our index and ring fingers.

“We can use measurements of these fingers as a way of gauging the relative exposure to these two hormones in the womb and as we have shown through this study, we can also use them to predict ability in the key areas of numeracy and literacy.”

The researchers made photocopies of the palm of the children’s hands and then measured the length of their index finger and ring finger on both hands using callipers, accurate to 0.01mm.

They then divided the length of the index finger by that of the ring finger – to calculate the child’s digit ratio.

When they compared this ratio to the children’s SAT scores, they found that a smaller ratio (i.e. a longer ring finger and therefore greater prenatal exposure to testosterone) meant a larger difference between ability in maths and literacy, favouring numeracy relative to literacy.

When they looked at boy’s and girl’s performance separately, the researchers found a clear link between high prenatal testosterone exposure, as measured by digit ratio, and higher numeracy SAT scores in males.

They also found a link between low prenatal testosterone exposure, which resulted in a shorter ring finger compared with the index finger, and higher literacy SAT scores for girls.

This, says the scientists behind the study, suggests that measurements of finger length could help predict how well children will do in maths and literacy.

“We’re not suggesting that finger length measurements could replace SAT tests,” said Dr Brosnan.

“Finger ratio provides us with an interesting insight into our innate abilities in key cognitive areas.

“We are also looking at how digit ratio relates to other behavioural issues, such as technophobia, and career paths.

“There is also interest in using digit ratio to identify developmental disorders, such as dyslexia, which can be defined in terms of literacy deficiencies.”

About the Author
Loz Blain Loz loves motorcycles - at the age of two, he told his mother "don't want brother, want mogabike." It was the biker connection that first brought Loz to Gizmag, but since then he's covered everything from alternative energy and weapons to medicine, marital aids - and of course, motorcycles. Loz also produces a number of video pieces for Gizmag, including his beloved bike reviews. He frequently disappears for weeks at a time to go touring with his vocal band Suade.   All articles by Loz Blain
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