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Dupont's ETFE - the miracle polymer that's shaping public architecture

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May 1, 2007

Kazakhstan's Khan Shatyry Entertainment Center, due for completion in 2008, a magnificent ...

Kazakhstan's Khan Shatyry Entertainment Center, due for completion in 2008, a magnificent ETFE spire as its centrepiece.

May 2, 2007 Dupont's innovative ETFE polymer is 1% the weight of glass. It stretches to three times its normal length without losing its elasticity, has controllable shading and noise insulation properties, and never gets dirty due to the non-stick properties it shares with its cousin Teflon. Laid out in sheets or blown up in pillows, it's being used in a number of fascinating major architectural developments, including the stadium and aquatic centre being built for Beijing's 2008 Olympics. It's developing a reputation as a "miracle polymer" for public architecture.

More information from our friends at Businessweek Online, including some stunning examples of how ETFE is being used around the world.

About the Author
Loz Blain Loz loves motorcycles - at the age of two, he told his mother "don't want brother, want mogabike." It was the biker connection that first brought Loz to Gizmag, but since then he's covered everything from alternative energy and weapons to medicine, marital aids - and of course, motorcycles. Loz also produces a number of video pieces for Gizmag, including his beloved bike reviews. He frequently disappears for weeks at a time to go touring with his vocal band Suade.   All articles by Loz Blain
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