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The Acabion GTBO 450 km/h road registerable streamliner

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March 19, 2007

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Stand by to be shocked. The Acabion GTBO is a streamlined, enclosed motorcycle with the most astounding set of vital statistics we’ve ever seen. It has an extremely low frontal area and the aerodynamics of a bullet. It tips the scales at just a fraction the weight of a Formula One race car yet has much less rolling resistance and it is powered by a 700 bhp turbocharged motor giving it a power-to-weight ratio better than anything ever conceived for road usage and is claimed to be capable of 450 km/h.

That’s some claim because the recently established land speed record for motorcycles is 565 km/h. The GTBO is also claimed to be capable of reaching 400 km/h from standstill in under 20 seconds (i.e. 0-400 km/h). AND it’s road registerable, AND Swiss-based Acabion intends to build 26 GTBOs over the next four years.

The GTBO is a two-plus-two-wheel concept. It runs on four wheels at low speeds and two wheels at high speeds. The sidewheels can be ordered as lightweight racing-versions (pictured) or with heavier but more practical struts with a compact hydraulic drive so you can manoeuvre quite easily.

The aim is to offer a limited edition, very expensive super vehicle with Swiss precision engineering and craftsmanship and a performance factor that is truly remarkable – the power-to weight of the GTBO is 0.51 kg per horsepower – compare that to the Ultima GTR (1.38 kg/bhp), Koenigsegg CCXR (1.16), Pagani Zonda F (2.07), Bugatti Veyron (1.89), Tramontana (1.74), Bristol Fighter T (1.58) and the Gumpert Apollo (1.53).

For the records, the GTBO’s figure is almost twice as good as the current crop of supersports 1000cc road bikes (1.0-1.1) and compares favorably to the 2007 F1 Ferrari (0.71) which Kimi Raikkonen used to smoke the field in the first Formula One Grand Prix of the season and Casey Stoner’s Ducati (0.60) which streeted Valentino Rossi’s Yamaha M1 (0.62) in the opening round of MotoGP in Qatar.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
2 Comments

Of course that would be \"weight-to-power ratio\" - not as quoted above.

professore

You\'re being to careful. I heard that it has 9000 hp and can go 1800 mph.

Come on guys. Be reasonable.

DrifterToo
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