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MathWorks introduces deployment of MATLAB algorithms to Java and .NET

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March 12, 2007

Using MATLAB Builder for Java from The MathWorks engineers can utilize buttons on the Java web page to shift perspectives, rotate, zoom, and pan call the servlet for use by anyone.

Using MATLAB Builder for Java from The MathWorks engineers can utilize buttons on the Java web page to shift perspectives, rotate, zoom, and pan call the servlet for use by anyone.

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March 13, 2007 Given the increasing use of algorithms, we expect many of our readers will rejoice at MathWorks newly announced introduction of two MATLAB builders that let application developers create algorithms in MATLAB and then incorporate them royalty-free into enterprise applications based on Java or .NET technologies. The new builders eliminate the time-consuming and error-prone process of recoding an algorithm created in MATLAB into Java or a .NET language. The new MATLAB Builders for .NET and Java will save considerable effort by repackaging algorithms developed in MATLAB into deployable components that can be used royalty-free in desktop and Web applications.

MATLAB Builder for Java converts MATLAB algorithms into standard Java classes that can be called from any Java application. MATLAB Builder for .NET converts MATLAB algorithms into standard .NET or Common Object Model (COM) components. With both builders, engineers and scientists can leverage the high-level language, technical functions, and visualization tools in MATLAB to efficiently prototype and develop their algorithms, which can then be distributed to users without MATLAB as components of desktop or Web applications.

MATLAB Builder for Java is available immediately for the Microsoft Windows, UNIX, and Linux platforms. MATLAB Builder for .NET is available immediately for the Microsoft Windows platform. U.S. list prices for each product start at US$4,000.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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