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Microsoft’s new Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000

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October 27, 2006

Microsoft’s new Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000

Microsoft’s new Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000

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October 28, 2006 Given all the convergence going on, it seems those items which we cannot do without will begin attracting their share of additional powers. Accordingly, Microsoft’s four-in-one Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000 makes perfect sense. It’s still an ergonomic Bluetooth laser mouse with all the company’s signature comfort and performance features, including tilt wheel and magnifier button but it also functions as a slide presenter, a laser pointer, digital ink device and a media remote control. So you can click through the slides of a presentation, highlight a key message with the laser pointer, draw on the presentation screen or control your Media Centre PC remotely. The bottom of the mouse features all the control buttons needed for presentation navigation or media control; users can play, pause, change tracks and adjust volume, or watch a DVD and it’s compatible with RealPlayer, iTunes and Windows Media Player. All for less than a hundred (US) bucks!

The Presenter Mouse 8000 mouse comes with Microsoft’s signature comfort and performance features, including laser technology, ergonomic design, Tilt Wheel and Magnifier button. New features include the Instant Viewer tool, with which at the touch of the button users can see each project they are working on and easily switch between applications for added productivity.

The mouse also comes with a carrying case to hold the transceiver and protect the mouse. Whether users are at home or on the go, the Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000 is the only device they need to deliver effective presentations, play media content and comfortably navigate on a PC.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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