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MV Agusta to produce US$125,000 310kmh motorcycle

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October 11, 2006

MV Agusta to produce US$125,000 310kmh motorcycle

MV Agusta to produce US$125,000 310kmh motorcycle

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October 12, 2006 The rumours regarding MV Agusta’s intentions to produce a limited edition motorcycle of immense power and cost have proven correct with information now beginning to escape the Italian factory regarding the New Limited Edition F4 100 and the first “spy shots” (pictured). The bike will be the most expensive production bike in the world at approximately EUR100,000 (US$125,000) and only 100 units will be produced. The all-new 1079cc motor will produce 190 bhp in Euro3 emmission-meeting mode and 200 bhp with open mufflers and will be electronically limited to 315 km/h. In keeping with a bike of such immense price, technologically advanced materials such as titanium, magnesium, and carbon fibre are used extensively and a special Brembo braking system has been produced just for the bike. Further proof that MV Agusta is positioning itself as the Ferrari of motorcycling (as if it’s needed) include the production of a special EUR1,500 (US$1,890) Versace jacket and a EUR15,000 (US$18,900) MV Agusta F4 100 wristwatch from a leading designer which will be sold only to owners of the bike, similar to the McLaren TAG Heuer.

The factory is strongly emphasising that the motor is all-new, and not an evolution of the existing motor – all-new conrods and pistons, cranckcases, a new oil cooled generator, titanium valve heads and many of the engine components are hand-made by machining.

Initially conceived by MV Agusta supremo Claudio Castiglioni, who designed the bike for himself, the exclusive model will be called F4 C.C., the initials of his name. The bike will debut at the Milan Motorcycle Show next month.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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