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Heatworx Gloves – heat protection AND dexterity

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July 28, 2006

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July 29, 2006 Having to work with very hot objects during our daily toil is thankfully not something most of us need to endure but it’s commonplace for many plumbers, metal fabricators, welders, steel workers and other industrial workers. Traditional heat gloves are known for protecting hands from high heat and flammable materials, but they're also known for what they can't do, which is to provide touch and feel that enables the user to perform detailed hands-on tasks.

Last year performance work glove manufacturer Ironclad showed around a concept glove which promised to change all that and it has now introduced its new Heatworx gloves which combine protection from high heat with exceptional dexterity and performance. The gloves incorporate a proprietary HotShield synthetic palm and Dupont Kevlar fabrics. HotShield has the look, feel and durability of leather, yet is heat and shrink resistant; water and oil repellent; and cut, puncture and abrasion resistant.

The Heatworx line debuts with three glove styles with varying levels of heat, abrasion and cut resistance.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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