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The rear-wheel-steer tricycle

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June 2, 2006

Image Gallery (9 images)

June 3, 2006 We never cease to be amazed at just how many combinations for three and four wheeled conveyances are possible in the quest to have some fun. Yet another completely new layout for the humble tricycle arrived on our desk this week and it's a far cry from the picture you see in your mind's eye when the word tricycle is mentioned. The new layout has been trademarked DriftRider and it's a reclining trike with a fixed front wheel and steering via both rear wheels. Offering a human-powered experience akin to that of the new motorsport known as drifting, we could see the US$170 DriftRider becoming a Christmas sensation as a new wave of tweens comes to grips with the machine's ability to slide, drift and do quite spectacular things. Check out the image gallery then the video - still images don't do the stunt capabilities justice.

DriftRider comes in three different sizes, making it suitable for tots through teens, with the primary difference in sizes facilitated by additional length of the single bar between the seat and the front wheel gooseneck. The tires are all pneumatic, not solid rubber. The front wheel drive is the same as a bicycle drive and it has bicycle brakes. The stopping capability is demonstrated in the video.

DriftRider is designed and manufactured by Steam International of Taiwan and distribution enquiries should be addressed to Alson Yen. The American DriftRider distributor is Stan Boyer of Tuffware.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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