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Motorola’s ingenious Bluetooth Skype and stereo music headphones

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April 6, 2006

Motorola’s ingenious Bluetooth Skype and stereo music headphones

Motorola’s ingenious Bluetooth Skype and stereo music headphones

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April 7, 2006 The Motorola Talk & Tunes Wireless Internet Calling Kit is just incredibly clever and useful and we think everyone will want a pair. It is the ultimate fusion of advanced entertainment, communications and convenience – it is relevant to anyone who ever listens to music on their PC or ever uses Skype (or any other VOIP app), or ever plans on doing so. The killer app is that it enables hands-free calling and music listening up to 30 feet (10 meters) away from your Bluetooth-enabled PC and if you don’t have a Bluetooth-enabled PC then you just plug in the Motorola Bluetooth PC Adapter PC850 (pictured above wireless headphones) into your ‘puters USB port and it all works.

What’s more, with the ability to control calls and music directly from the Motorola Bluetooth HT820 headphones (left ear side of the headphones controls the phone, the right your music and there’s an integrated microphone in there too), you can talk or listen without being wired to the computer, taking internet calls between other digital audio activities such as music, internet radio, audio books, podcasting ad infinitum. When a call comes in, the music pauses, allowing you to answer directly from the headphones. When the call is complete, the music will automatically resume.

A full charge gives you approximately 14 hours of music listening or 17 hours of phone talk time from a single charge.

There’s no pricing yet, but the Motorola Talk & Tunes Wireless Internet Calling Kit with stereo is expected to be available in Q2 2006.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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