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Handtop PC combines desktop power, instant-on PDA convenience and connected functionality of a cell phone

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January 12, 2006

Handtop PC combines desktop power, instant-on PDA convenience and connected functionality ...

Handtop PC combines desktop power, instant-on PDA convenience and connected functionality of a cell phone

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January 13, 2006 The DualCor cPC is a pretty special device and one which demands the attention of professionals who get out of the office a lot but don’t want to forego the power of a desktop when they’re travelling. It is the first ultra portable personal computer to simultaneously run full-function Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition 2005 and Windows Mobile 5.0 operating systems, offering the best of both worlds. This unique device represents a new category of hardware for global enterprise computing and promises to end the compromise between mobility, functionality and productivity for the mobile business professional.

The DualCor cPC is the only all-in-one, wireless "handtop" (handheld-desktop) computer that combines the power of a desktop PC, the instant-on convenience of a PDA and the always-connected functionality of a cell phone. Measuring just 6.5" x 3.3" x 1.2", the DualCor cPC offers unprecedented battery life for enterprise computing, Internet access, e-mail and talk time. A patented dual processor architecture and integrated 40GB hard drive allows the DualCor cPC to run fully enabled desktop applications such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint, and non-diluted versions of enterprise applications like SAP, Oracle and Microsoft, while retaining the instant-on, always-on functionality and long-lasting power of a PDA and cell phone.

"The DualCor cPC holds the potential to carve out its own place in the world of ultra portable computers and opens the door to a new category in global enterprise mobility," said Tim Bajarin, president, Creative Strategies, Inc. "The strengths inherent within a product like the cPC could deliver serious benefits to the medical and pharmaceutical industries, as well as retail, transportation and even government and military."

The DualCor cPC offers robust features and extreme flexibility for the mobile knowledge worker in supporting the traditional office environment as well as working at home, working from a client location, and working as a perennial road warrior. The cPC utilizes two processors (1.5 GHz and 400 MHz); 1 GB of DDR2 RAM; a 5" inch, 800x480 resolution, 262K color, touch screen display; three USB Hi-Speed 2.0 ports; a headset and phone jack; integrated Compact Flash Type II; mini-VGA port; speaker, microphone and mouse controls. A full-size, DualCor stowaway keyboard provides an uncompromised typing experience, with integrated track-stick navigation, user-programmable command keys and an adjustable display-angle docking system.

"The market response to the cPC has been overwhelmingly positive. Customers, partners and analysts alike have aligned in their collective praise and shared recognition of the cPC as a competitive differentiator in the world of mobile enterprise computing," said Steve Hanley, president and chief executive officer, DualCor Technologies. "By providing unmatched performance, unrivaled battery life and unprecedented functionality, we are confident the DualCor cPC will not only meet the needs of today's mobile business professional but will redefine how they work."

"We're excited to see tablet functionality appear in a broad range of mobile PC products," said Chris Barry, group product manager of Tablet PC at Microsoft Corp. "The DualCor product is an innovative approach to providing full PC functionality in a highly mobile form factor."

The DualCor cPC will retail for US$1,500 and is expected to be available in the first quarter of 2006.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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