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Road registerable driving simulator

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November 14, 2005

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November 15, 2005 Major automotive shows are a never-ending source of innovation fodder, as manufacturers manifest the ideas they’ve been working on into concept cars and carefully monitor, segment and learn from the public’s reaction. The SEMA show in Las Vegas seems to go a step further, with some outrageous ideas taking on showroom form though they’re never likely to ever become more than limited edition customs – these cars are designed to showcase capabilities and though they often seem remarkably indulgent, sometimes, they strike a chord and a whole new automotive concept materialises. Such is the case with this open-air, fully-drivable speedster concept from Five Axis and Scion (one of Toyota’s spin-off brands). It is a drivable driving simulator.

Drive it somewhere, flip the hood, which hinges forward to create a screen, then light up the headrest mounted Casio XJ-560 video projector to create a two-seat video game peripheral for the car’s internal Microsoft XBOX 360 video game system. More than two drivers can be accommodated as the perspex nacelles behind the headrests pop open to reveal two 19” Samsung LCD screens. Last year at SEMA, the same folks created the xB mobile DJ vehicle. Manufacturers have been circling the entertainment on wheels concept for several years, with another notable concept being Honda's Fuya Jo.

Finished in Persimmon Pearl (red to you), the 5 Axis Scion xA speedster racing simulator drives goes a tad better than the five-door, five-seat Scion xA it was based on thanks to an AEM Cold Air Intake, new Exhaust System, brakes, tyres, wheels, suspension.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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