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Dual screen display from a single unit

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October 5, 2005

Dual screen display from a single unit

Dual screen display from a single unit

October 6, 2005 Japanese in-car entertainment equipment manufacturer Fujitsu Ten has a great concept about to hit the stores (alas Japan only) in the form of a dashboard entertainment and information display with one screen but different visuals and images a when viewed from different angles such as the drivers seat and the passenger seat. Logically, the driver will be wanting to look at navigational displays and other informational aids from time to time, so the dual display enables the passenger to watch a movie or do something entirely different – at least the choice is there. The clever screen was developed by Sharp and we can’t think of too many other situations where it’s likely to be used other than in an automotive sense. Toyota has inked a deal that makes Fujitsu Ten OEM supplier for all its in-car screens and has already begun offering the dual screen functionality in japan, so we’re tipping it’ll be standard on future Toyota models across the world. Two viewing angles isn’t the end of it all - there’s also a digital TV tuner which ensures a stable picture even when traveling at speed and a 30Gb hard drive, so you won't run out of space for MP3s this lifetime.

The specification for the new unit (code-named DUAL AVN7905HD) was jointly developed with Toyota and Fujitsu Ten will become standard equipment on Toyotas in the future, so you can expect to see the dual screen in Toyota models in the not-too-distant-future. And the Fujitsu unit will be in the shops by December 1 at the approximate price of 315,000 Yen – approximately US$2750 – and only in Japan at this stage.

Via Uber Gadget Blog Engadget – thanks Pete

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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