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RAZRWIRE Bluetooth enabled sunglasses redefines hands-free mobility

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July 25, 2005

RAZRWIRE Bluetooth enabled sunglasses redefines hands-free mobility

RAZRWIRE Bluetooth enabled sunglasses redefines hands-free mobility

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July 26, 2005 Motorola and Oakley have announced that the much-awaited RAZRWIRE Bluetooth eyewear will be available in the US in early August at US$300. RAZRWIRE combines Oakley optics with Bluetooth wireless technology so you can listen to a Bluetooth MP3 player or carry on phone conversations while up to 30 feet away from your compatible Bluetooth-enabled cell phone. It also means you can hike, run, row, play or ride a bike, as Lance Armstrong regularly demonstrated over the last month during the Tour de France when he was regularly seen wearing his RAZRWIRE species.

"Seamless mobility is here, now with the availability of RAZRWIRE" said Bruce Hawver, vice president of companion products, Motorola's Mobile Device business. "Motorola and Oakley are bringing innovative wearable technology to life. With this one-of-a-kind Bluetooth-enabled mobile eyewear, active consumers can stay connected while moving from one environment to the next.”

Bluetooth Module

RAZRWIRE is armed with Motorola’s third generation Bluetooth technology and supports Bluetooth RF protocol 1.1 and 1.2 ensuring compatibility with most Bluetooth-enabled cellular phones and other Bluetooth devices. Esthetically, the Bluetooth module is designed to complement the overall look of the sunglasses, creating truly wearable technology.

The intuitive, easy-to-use controls include two volume buttons and a single button used to handle incoming and outgoing calls. RAZRWIRE allows you to carry on phone conversations while up to 30 feet away from your compatible Bluetooth-enabled cell phone. Charging is easy using an included wall charger or through a USB computer port using an optional cable.

Bluetooth Sniff Mode technology increases the battery life of RAZRWIRE, offering continuous talk time of more than five hours and standby time of up to approximately 100 hours. RAZRWIRE is designed for comfort – module’s speaker can be worn on either ear or removed entirely depending on your preference.

RAZRWIRE Sunglasses

For durability and all-day comfort, the RAZRWIRE frame is made of Oakley’s proprietary O-Luminum, an alloy 40 percent lighter than titanium. Custom engineered spring hinges provide a secure, adaptable fit, and soft Unobtainium components increase grip with perspiration for virtually any activity your involved in. The Plutonite lenses, which filter out 100 percent of UV and harmful blue light, feature Oakley’s patented XYZ Optics, an innovation that maximizes clarity at all angles of vision throughout all surfaces of the wrapped lens contours.

The semi-rimless design means there’s no frame rim to block your downward view. The engineering construction of the lens and frame meets all ANSI Z87.1 standards for impact protection. RAZRWIRE can also accommodate Oakley prescription lenses with an optional prescription lens adapter.

RAZRWIRE Availability

RAZRWIRE will have limited availability at select Cingular Wireless retail locations and online at www.cingular.com, www.hellomoto.com, and www.oakley.com in early August for US$294.99. This includes the sunglasses, Bluetooth module and a wall charging unit. RAZRWIRE will initially be available in three color frame/lens color combinations, including Platinum/Gold Iridium, Pewter/Black Iridium and Mercury/Gray.

Wider distribution of RAZRWIRE will include additional Cingular stores and Oakley's own retail stores and sunglass specialty locations later in the third quarter. Additional information can be found at www.oakley.motorola.com.

If you’re interested in the RAZRWIRE Sunglasses and can’t wait until August, Oakley already have MP3 sunglasses on the market in THUMP!

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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