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Global Weather Application for Microsoft Windows Mobile-Based Smartphones

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April 11, 2005

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April 12, 2005 The weather report has long been one of the most critical information services for humankind. Most people check it every day to decide what they will wear, how they will manage their schedule and in some areas, how they will prepare in order to survive. Despite a comprehensive set of Government-run weather forecasting services around the globe, more and better-delivered weather information is now shaping as one of mobile’s killer applications. Get set for the complete hand-held weather information service via your mobile phone - instant live local weather, severe weather alerts, forecasts, radar, camera images and international weather conditions from 200 countries are all about to become available via Windows Mobile-based Smartphone mobile phones.

The service will be provided by Weatherbug, America’s (indeed, the world’s) largest exclusive weather network, which has 8,000 live WeatherBug Tracking Stations and over 1,000 cameras that generate neighborhood level reports every second.

WeatherBug has the number one weather Internet application (over 60 million downloads), that streams live neighborhood conditions to its home and work users and an indication of the popularity of the internet service is that WeatherBug.com had more than 19 million unique visitors (that’s not visits, or page views or hits, but unique visitors – roughly the population of Australia) in February 2005 and is ranked as a top 10 Internet property in daily reach, according to comScore Media Metrix, making it the leader in online weather.

The network doesn’t end there, with a suite of different weather-related services available, for education, vertical industry markets, and most importantly, WeatherBug Media Services, which delivers live weather information to over 80 million U.S. households through partnerships with more than 100 television stations.

Now the power of the WeatherBug internet application is going to become available via Windows Mobile-based Smartphones and will deliver precise live weather conditions, the most relevant reports, and the earliest weather warnings available safeguard an individual’s property and life.

WeatherBug's Smartphone application also connects wireless customers with over 1,000 live cameras around the U.S. and opens them up to an active community of WeatherBug users who submit photos of their outdoor experiences and severe weather, as it's happening.

WeatherBug Mobile for Windows Mobile-based Smartphone is available for a one-time charge of US$14.95. A three-day "try before you buy" offer is also available and it will be interesting to see just how compelling knowing about the weather will become in the wireless environment – we suspect it will be one of the most viable new mobile services of the next decade.

For more information or to subscribe to this new service, visit Weatherbug, Handango or Microsoft.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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