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New Citroen C6 incorporates active suspension and head-up display

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February 10, 2005

New Citroen C6 incorporates active suspension and head-up display

New Citroen C6 incorporates active suspension and head-up display

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February 11, 2005 Citroen gave the world a look at its new C6 today in a sneak preview of the World debut at the Geneva Motor Show. The latest addition to an historic line, the C6 takes the grand tourer concept and incorporates the latest cutting-edge technology. An executive saloon that represents the latest stage in the creative renewal of the brand, the C6 has been inspired by the large Citroëns of the past, models that have helped the marque to establish a strong heritage in large cars. The complete and innovative range of high-tech features includes a head-up display, the first application in a Citroen of the new 208 bhp V6 HDi diesel engine, active suspension with variable damping, the Company's lane departure warning system and directional Xenon headlamps.

It features a carefully designed driving position, incorporating an easy-to-read driver's instrument panel, a large central screen and a head-up display. Making an important contribution to active safety, this display unit projects essential information - on speed and navigation for example - onto the windscreen.

A first for the Citroen range, the C6 is equipped with an electric parking brake. This new feature is offered alongside numerous intelligent driving aids pioneered by Citroen, such as a lane departure warning system, front and rear parking sensors, directional Xenon headlamps, cruise control and a speed limiter.

The top-of-the-range positioning of the Citroen C6 is reflected by its engine line-up: two V6 engines, one diesel and one petrol, place the emphasis on driving pleasure and refinement. A new 2.7 litre HDi diesel engine develops 208 bhp DIN (150 kW) and is equipped with a particulate filter, while the 3-litre petrol engine develops 215 bhp DIN (155 kW). Both engines are mated to 6-speed automatic gearboxes.

Traditionally, large Citroen cars have featured an advanced suspension, and the new C6 is no different. The new active suspension with variable damping allows it to set new standards in terms of comfort, road-holding and power.

Each feature of the cabin has been designed to provide exceptional on-board comfort: multi-adjustable seats, excellent sound-proofing, thermal comfort and a specially designed driving position.

The original design of both the driving position and the ergonomic dashboard allow drivers to keep their eyes on the road at all times, whilst laminated side windows also help to improve driver concentration by filtering out external noise.

Occupants benefit from generous amounts of interior space, while passengers in the back can adjust the electrically-controlled sliding rear seats to obtain the ideal, relaxed seating position.

The stowage compartments in the doors are inspired by the latest trends in home furniture design, thus reinforcing the concept of the car as a "lounge on wheels".

Citroen is continually working to improve passenger well-being, and the C6 introduces an air conditioning system with separate left/right and front/rear controls. It includes a soft diffusion system, designed to create a uniform blanket of air around the front passengers and to enhance thermal comfort.

Both classic and yet thoroughly original at the same time, the Citroen C6 sets itself apart from the models that currently set the standard in the sector while meeting all the requirements of an executive car: elegance, refinement and presence. On top of all this, the C6 adds Citroen's own unique stamp: combining a strong emotional appeal with the application of cutting-edge technology.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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