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Microdrives continue to get smaller in size and larger in capacity

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January 18, 2005

Microdrives continue to get smaller in size and larger in capacity

Microdrives continue to get smaller in size and larger in capacity

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January 19, 2005 - Storage continues to get smaller in size, larger in capacity and cheaper seemingly every month. Hitachi continues to lead the way with the unveiling of a smaller one-inch Microdrive product and a slimmer 1.8-inch hard drive that will be available later this year. These two miniature drives are designed to meet the accelerating demand for ultra-portable handheld devices - such as mobile phones and digital music players - that don't compromise on storage capacity. Hitachi has re-engineered its one-inch Microdrive to create a 20-percent smaller version with a capacity of 8 to 10 GB and trimmed 30% off the size of its new 1.8-inch Travelstar drive to create the world's smallest and lightest 1.8-inch drive, beating the closest competitor by 10 percent in total volume.

January 19, 2005 - Storage continues to get smaller in size, larger in capacity and cheaper seemingly every month. Hitachi continues to lead the way with the unveiling of a smaller one-inch Microdrive product and a slimmer 1.8-inch hard drive that will be available later this year. These two miniature drives are designed to meet the accelerating demand for ultra-portable handheld devices - such as mobile phones and digital music players - that don't compromise on storage capacity.

Hitachi has re-engineered its one-inch Microdrive to create a 20-percent smaller version with a capacity of 8 to 10 GB and trimmed 30% off the size of its new 1.8-inch Travelstar drive to create the world's smallest and lightest 1.8-inch drive, beating the closest competitor by 10 percent in total volume.

The new babies in the Hitachi family represent a novel approach to the hard drive industry's continuing quest for high capacity in smaller and smaller form factors. Hitachi is retaining the one-inch and 1.8-inch disk size for maximum capacity, but trimming the package footprint for greater agility. The Microdrive is expected to make his debut in the second half of 2005 at a mere 14 grams and in an embedded-only design. The Travelstar will also make his entrance in the latter half of the year with 30-40 GB capacit.

The Microdrive will be the industry's smallest (40 x 30 x 5 mm ) one-inch hard drive with the highest storage capacity and will use 40-percent less power than the existing Microdrive product.

Because the applications for which the microdrive is intended are highly portable devices, Hitachi has provided for additional methods of shock protection beyond the drive's internal mechanisms, which will double the drive's capacity to withstand operating-shock and this robustness can be further enhanced using "snubbers" or drive bumpers to supply additional shock protection.

At 49 grams, the new 1.8-inch Travelstar is very light and will be offered in one- and two-disk versions, offering 30-40 and 60-80 GB of storage, respectively. The physical dimensions are expected to be 71 x 54 x 5 mm on the one-disk model, while the two-disk model will differ just slightly with an 8-mm height instead of 5 mm.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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