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US$200 Data Destroyer Device Stops Information Theft on Discarded Discs

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May 31, 2005

US$200 Data Destroyer Device Stops Information Theft on Discarded Discs

US$200 Data Destroyer Device Stops Information Theft on Discarded Discs

UPDATED June 1, 2005 The potential for the theft of data or sensitive business information via CD-ROMs being thrown in the trash is very realistic - garbage screening is a rudimentary and commonly-used industrial espionage technique. And despite their seeming vulnerability, you'd be surprised what you can get off a Cd-ROM using data recovery techniques. So what to do? Buy a Data Destroyer Office PRO - the automated desktop device can destroy the information on up to 50 CDs and/or DVDs by pressing a single button.

The Data Destroyer Office PRO applies thousands of tiny imprints to both sides of each disc to ensure that no data is recoverable, preventing identity theft and corporate espionage.

Just load the spindle, press the button, and the it feeds each disc into a special destruction slot on a timed basis. As each disc is processed, the next one is automatically retrieved from the gravity-fed input bin without the need for manual intervention. Each disc is destroyed in less than seven seconds, enabling 50 discs to be processed in roughly five minutes.

The imprint strategy eliminates the risk that portions of the disc can still be read after manual efforts to scratch or mutilate it. It also eliminates the problem of disposing of the sharp shards created when discs are broken or shredded.

The unit measures just 14" x 8" x 11", offering a shoebox-sized desktop footprint that allows it to be placed anywhere in the office. It plugs into the wall and comes with a UL-approved AC adapter.

The Data Destroyer Office PRO is available for US$42.99 via Think Geek

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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