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Sit down and relax - it's time for a workout

Sit down and relax - it's time for a workout

Sit down and relax - it's time for a workout

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Friday December 5, 2003Attracted by the idea of exercise but not the reality of actually doing it? This could be the fitness solution for you. Nexus Corporation in Japan has released a new type of passive exercise machine that utilizes Memory Stick media to deliver customised training programs without any need for exertion on the part of user.The BEXER series of fitness machines use precision servo motors and actuators to guide the users movements through a controlled workout that gradually builds in intensity as the body warms up. Just don't get your Memory Stick mixed up with an Olympic gymnast or you could tear yourself apart - literally.Catering for people with reduced physical stamina or strength and for rehabilitation purposes - as well as for those who simply don't like exercise - the machines are available in three models - BEXER BR-1 for chest, shoulder, hip joint exercise, BEXER BR-2 for back exercise and BEXER BR-3 for arm and leg exercise.The fitness role reversal enables users to be led naturally through a training regimen tailored to their needs - providing the correct amount of aerobic exercise while improving the mobility of joints, strengthening muscles and reducing body fat.All three models use Memory Stick media to store the individual programs. Programs can be run directly from the Memory Stick, which plugs straight into the machine, and specific data on your workout can be and transferred to PC for analysis including the amount of calories burned in a session.The Nexus BEXER series of exercise machines is currently available in Japan.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon After Editing or Managing over 50 print publications primarily in the role of a Magazine Doctor, Mike embraced the internet full-time in 1995 and became a "start-up all-rounder" – quite a few start-ups later, he founded Gizmag in 2002. Now he can write again.   All articles by Mike Hanlon
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