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Lounge room of the future at ACMI

By

August 29, 2003

Image Gallery (4 images)

Saturday August 30, 2003

Dubbed "Pods", the Screen Lounges at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) provide a personalised, interactive "lounge room of the future" for individuals or small audiences. A range of experiences will be on offer in the intimate Screen Lounge environment including short films and digital media based on current themes of exhibits, games, television, interactive works and access to the extensive ACMI collection available as video on demand or online via other content partners.

Each Lounge is a "multimedia jukebox" programmable by users for research or entertainment purposes, so you can program a mini short film festival or digital art presentation for a group of friends.

Viewers can also choose one of the pre-selected programs that run for up to an hour each.
The Screen Lounges are one of several ways in which ACMI is using innovative design and delivery to bring access to screen culture. Opened in late 2002 at Federation Square in the heart of Melbourne, ACMI houses the World's largest screen gallery - a huge subterranean space measuring 110 metres long and 15 metres wide where a state-of-the-art media platform is used to display different images on up to 250 screens- two multi-format cinemas that cater for 8mm, 16mm, 35mm and 70mm film, multiple video formats and data projection - plus a hands-on Digital Studio workshop where multimedia content can be generated in a classroom environment and a production amphitheatre known as the Screen Pit.

Bookings are required to use of the Screen Lounges - visit www.acmi.net.au to learn more.

About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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