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Porsche tuning house Gemballa introduces diamond-based car coating

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May 25, 2012

Gemballa promises that its diamond finish will be a friend of both men and women

Gemballa promises that its diamond finish will be a friend of both men and women

German tuner Gemballa has announced an innovation that should lead to many cars that surpass the gaudiness of even its own gold-splashed Mirage GT Gold Edition. It's a car finish made from crushed diamonds.

"When Gemballa speaks of diamonds, we really mean it", says CEO Andreas Schwarz. "Our complex process uses genuine diamonds as its key ingredient – not metal pigments, glass fragments, or crystals."

Gemballa's challenge was to crush the diamonds small enough that they could be applied fluidly like paint while still maintaining their sparkle ... because what good is having diamond paint if people can't see it from a mile down the highway? According to the tuner, grinding stones into a fine powder actually helps to increase shine, thanks to the innumerable reflective facets of the ground stones.

Gemballa hasn't elaborated on where we might see an actual application of the diamond finish, but it does mention that due to the diamond's carbon makeup, it will make for a natural accent atop carbon fiber body work. It also says that the finish can be applied on both the exterior and interior. We have a feeling a Mirage GT Diamond Edition is deep in the works.

So yes, Gemballa is dedicating some of the world's most beautiful, sought-after precious stones toward making its paint extra sparkly. Just one more way for the rich to feel all warm and privileged inside, we suppose.

Source: Gemballa via World Car Fans

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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7 Comments

I see a safety issue here.

The reflections from some cars' rear windows can be annoying enough at times, without some idiot with more money than sense making their entire care reflective and presumably dazzling from miles away.

Alien
25th May, 2012 @ 07:17 pm PDT

Diamonds are not as rare as people make out they are, diamond can be made artificially and diamond dust can be collected from diamond cutting. The saying 'Diamonds are a girls best friend' is nothing more than a marketing champaign for the diamonds found in the ground by slave children and marked after cut with a brand name. I really get the feeling this is nothing more than a promo exercise from the diamond industry, the glorification of carbon.

Jugen
26th May, 2012 @ 06:05 am PDT

Looks like glitter. I didn't know Porsche wanted to attract teenage girls. They usually can't buy a sport cars that expensive.

VoiceofReason
26th May, 2012 @ 10:36 am PDT

If a car is caught speeding in a speed camera zone flash photography from the camera depends upon a certain level of reflected light, it is therefore illegal to have reflective plates and by that precident reflective coatings on cars which stop traffic monitoring by speed cameras.

This will not stop a German company selling the paint but a car with it sticks out like a sore thumb, unlike the original reflective number plates.

L1ma
27th May, 2012 @ 05:20 am PDT

@ Alien, i agree with your comment.

Nantha Kumar Nithiahnanthan
27th May, 2012 @ 07:09 am PDT

I agree with Jugen. Diamonds indeed are not rare. This will give DeBeers something to do with those millions of diamonds they horde just to keep the price up. And that's on top of the man-made diamonds.

I always liked the glitter of a silver flake paint job or the metallic paints but this I've got to see.

I thought at first the aim might be the durability of a diamond based paint but I guess that's not the deal. I've seen diamond cutting wheels with fine diamond particles embedded in them and I don't remember any glitter. Oh well, learn something every day.

Mr E

Mr E
28th May, 2012 @ 01:33 pm PDT

This is not necessarily for rich people, first off, because they can easily use synthetics. There are many applications for diamond dust already. Something has to be done with all of the junk leftover after the millions of new diamonds cut every year for jewelry and larger applications. Also, there are many, many, many diamonds of too-low of a quality to use in jewelry, so they can be used for this type of application.

Dave Andrews
6th June, 2012 @ 10:34 am PDT
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