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Flash Drive Lock fits any standard USB memory stick

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August 12, 2009

The Flash Drive Lock

The Flash Drive Lock

If you’re looking for some hardware-based protection to supplement data encryption on your USB memory stick, you might want to consider the Flash Drive Lock. The combination lock fits to the end of any standard USB memory stick and can’t be removed without inputting the correct three-digit code, thereby preventing any nefarious types from inserting the drive into a computer’s USB slot.

The Flash Drive Lock allows the user to set their own three-digit code and the distributors claim the lock is a must for any office computer user, especially civil servants, who must be a particularly nosy bunch. The lock probably won’t prevent any determined sticky beaks, so users wouldn’t want to discard any encryption tools being used to protect data from prying eyes, but the device could deter casual snoops.

The Flash Drive Lock is available in red or silver for UKP£5.95 for a single unit, or UKP£9.90 for two.

Via: Red Ferret

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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4 Comments

Imagine you forget your code. You have no clue of the combination. Similar to looking at an all-white piece of paper. You deside to use the time needed for all combinations until you succeed.

Next step is to cound from 000 to 999 with what? 1sec per step? It will take you less than 20 min - not to find the right combination - but to test ALL. On average a thief will have to use only 10 min before he can unlock the data...

I fully understand why the author of the above article recommends also to use encryption.

You deside yourself how secure you find this solution. I'll rather save the �6 for a pint or two :)

Ole Eriksen
13th August, 2009 @ 03:58 am PDT

how do i no what the password is for my flash lock

Facebook User
27th November, 2010 @ 05:18 am PST

Reminds me of the pressed sheetmetal locks - that sell for $5 for a pack of four from the discount shop.

A USB 3 code lock - Hammer, screw driver, pliers, bolt cutters - with a little practice - 10 seconds per lock.

Mr Stiffy
4th December, 2011 @ 05:16 pm PST

It's like most locks--it keeps honest people away from temptation...

More useful would be a memory stick that sent out audio and web alarms when the wrong password is entered.

This also looks like it could easily be cracked with just the pliers on my multi-tool....

Charles Barnard
22nd December, 2011 @ 11:28 am PST
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