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Along with the various new features to individual applications that mark any full revision to Adobe’s Creative Suite, this year’s CS6 release saw the introduction of a new subscription model called Adobe Creative Cloud. We recently had a chance to chat with Adobe Creative guru Michael Stoddart who walked us through some of the new changes implemented in CS6. Read More
Neil Armstrong, the test pilot, aerospace engineer, university professor, United States Naval Aviator and American astronaut, has died at the age of 82 in Cincinnati, Ohio. His death was due to complications resulting from recent cardiovascular procedures carried out to relieve blocked arteries. He will forever be remembered by the history books as the first man to step foot on the Moon, the defining moment for a generation and inspiration to the generations that followed. Read More
The near-ubiquitousness of camera-equipped smartphones has seen many ditch their dedicated cameras in favor of the convenience of snapping shots on their phone. But although the quality of the camera in the iPhone has improved over the various iterations of that device, there are still many things a dedicated camera is better at. But you don't have to lug around a fancy DSLR to up your photography game … here are 10 compact cameras that offer something the iPhone can't. Read More
Ever taken a digital photograph and then found out you had missed the fine details that made the scene so impressive visually? Applying a Photoshop sharpen filter may make the photo appear sharper, but such filters are lossy - they actually reduce the amount of fine detail in the image. Until recently, there was very little you could do to improve the image after the shot. That has now changed. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have developed a super-resolution process which pulls unseen details from the nooks and crannies of a single digital photograph. Their process can capture true detail which cannot be seen in the original image - the next "killer app"? Read More
The recent discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) of a massive particle "consistent with" the predicted properties of the Higgs boson hit the news with the force of a hurricane. But the phrase "consistent with" suggests that the CERN observation may also be "consistent with" other types of particle. Is it or isn't it? We're going to attempt to clarify the situation for you. Read More
The Cholmondeley Pageant of Power (CPoP) turned on its annual kaleidoscope of horsepower, adrenalin and engineering intrigue this week. The four wheel lap record was shattered by a Caterham, the BAC Mono was the fastest road car, while the cars running against the clock included an Ariel Atom 500 V8, Radical SR3 SL, Aston Martin One-77 and Noble M600. There was a Volkswagen "Schwimmwagen" amphibian, an Edison-Puton Monowheel, and a curious BMW built during WWI using a 45.8-liter V12 BMW aircraft engine. The gallery is a wonderful pictorial celebration of CPoP. Read More
Public transport systems offer many advantages over the personal alternatives when it comes to getting large numbers of people from A to B in style and safety - less congestion, less pollution and lower costs for starters. But while we certainly see plenty of impetus on the personal transport front here at Gizmag, fresh concepts for the future of mass transport don't seem to enjoy the same level of exposure, despite the fact that many cities around the world are still saddled with public transport infrastructure that's been in place for over a century. There are some radical plans in the works, however, and the 21st Century will undoubtedly bring with it a raft of people moving projects that redefine our notion of public transport. So just what will be pulling into the station in 50 years time? Read on for our pick of the most tantalizing concepts out there. Read More
The propagation of new thought in any global arena doesn't take long these days and with rapid development teams capable of building and testing prototypes in just a few months, entire markets can seemingly spring from nowhere. In 2009, JetLev showed its US$100,000 Jetlev (top left). Within months of production starting, French PWC legend Franky Zapata recognized that most of the hardware required for such a device was already contained in a PWC and created the Flyboard (top right) - a US$7500 accessory that attaches to any existing PWC with 150 plus horsepower. Now the people who brought you the Sea Breacher (bottom left) have completed a long-standing project to build the Jetovator (bottom right), a jet bike with a motorcycle seating position and controls. Three competitors makes a market - and all inside three short years. Read More
The concept of a floating island has been with us throughout history, but sprang back into the limelight just four years ago when Wally Yachts came up with an island-themed megayacht named the Wally Island. At an estimated US$200 million, the Wally Island was not designed for the common man, but the concept appears to have ignited a flurry of activity in the marine industry, with new designs focused on a comfortable movable living space that breaks the naval architectural mold. Now an Austrian-based company intends to manufacture much smaller, tailor made miniature floating islands, at a fraction of the cost. Read More
The first people to colonize Mars might be reality TV show contestants. No, this is not a joke - it's a tremendously ambitious, eyebrow-raising plan devised by Dutch company Mars One. Next year, the company aims to select several teams of four astronauts each, and the public will be the final judge as to which team will get the ticket for a (one-way!) seven-month trip to the Red Planet in 2023. Read More