Photokina 2014 highlights

Ever Increasing Watch plots the time on a graph

By

May 22, 2010

The Ever Increasing Watch

The Ever Increasing Watch

Image Gallery (6 images)

Watches, movies, poems and paintings... a lot of people think that the harder any one of these things are to understand, then the better they are. We’ve certainly covered some intentionally-obscure watches here at Gizmag before, with everything from a row of LEDs to numbers on a sphere to dots that get filled in and stained glass-like patterns used to display the time. Now, Japanese weird-watch-maker EleeNo brings us one that displays the hours, minutes and seconds on a climbing line graph.

The face of the Ever Increasing Watch has two grid displays. Plotted points along a blue line on the top grid indicate the hour, while yellow and red lines on the lower grid indicate the minute and second. In a nod to user-friendliness, the press of a button will bring up a tiny numeral at the last point on each line. Just be aware, using that button would make you no better than someone who actually – God forbid – asks a modern artist what their sculpture represents.

The Ever Increasing Watch plots the time on climbing line graphs

The brass-bodied watch is water resistant to three atmospheres (20 meters/66 feet), and has a “special coating” on its mineral glass lens that reportedly makes it easier to read in bright light. It’s available for US$179 at Yanko Design. While you’re on that page, also take a peek at the Scope Watch. Cripes! What’s next, any ideas? Let’s hear ‘em!

Via Ubergizmo.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
Tags
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our 28,547 articles