While the big American automakers continue to battle for market share in the muscle car segment, one boutique manufacturer in Michigan has developed its own interpretation of the genre. The Equus Bass 770 is an unashamed impersonator that mixes the old world and the new ... a muscle car with a taste for life's little luxuries.

With a name that sounds more like a horse trailer with a thumpin' stereo system than a muscle car, Equus’ Bass 770 is all about the modern day realization of a “what if” scenario. What if you took DNA from a 1967 Mustang Fastback, a 1968 and a 2013 Camaro, plus a ’71 Plymouth Satellite, and stirred it all up in a big aluminum pot?

The answer just might be the Equus Bass 770. More Mustang than anything else, the car communicates old world design in a variety of ways. The fastback, roofline and overall profile speak of mid-60’s Mustangs. The front end is a mish-mash of 70’s Chrysler and new-age Camaro headlight treatments, the taillights recall late 60s Chrysler products and ... we could go on, but you get the picture. This is a mixed bag.

The Bass 770's muscle is provided by a 640 hp supercharged aluminum V8. These power figures, in partnership with 605 lb.ft of torque and a 6-speed manual gearbox, translate into a reported 0- 60 mph (0-96 km/h) acceleration time of only 3.4 seconds and a top speed of 200 mph (321 km/h).

Unlike the inspirational cars that the Bass 770 plays homage to, the handcrafted interior of this car isn't what you'd call bare-bones. It's saturated in black leather with more that a hint of chrome and the retro steering wheel sits proudly next to the console mounted touch screen.

Equus has used an aluminum chassis to keep weight down and performance figures up. The Bass 770 tips the scales at a hefty 3640 lb. (1650 kg). A “superformed aluminum body” with carbon fiber inners is in place to enhance structural rigidity and strength.

The muscle car rolls on big 255/40 ZR19 tires up front and 285/40 ZR19’s on the back and decaleration comes via Brembo brake calipers and carbon ceramic discs.

And, unlike a 1965 Mustang, Equus has seen to incorporating key driving technology into the car. Items like Magnetic Selective Ride Control, Performance Traction Management, an Active Handling System with traction control and variable-ratio power steering are noted as standard on the Bass 770.

Although Equus’ Bass 770 is retro-pretty, it’s not cheap. Orders vary from US$250,000 for a fully equipped model to $290,000.

Source: Equus