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Electronics

Electronic items such as mobile phones contain dangerous amounts of lead

Lead is a toxic substance, and it’s in your mobile phone. It’s also probably in your TV, your computer, and just about any other electronic appliance where mechanical movement is transformed into an electrical signal. All those devices utilize PZT, a substance which contains lead, and that generates an electrical charge when subjected to pressure. While lead has been phased out of most consumer goods, a suitable alternative has never been found for use in electronics... until now, perhaps. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have developed an innocuous material with PZT-like qualities, and it’s made in a fashion somewhat like cookies.  Read More

Another massive Diamond Vision display from Mitsubishi, this time in Japan

NFL football fans will no doubt be familiar with Mitsubishi's world-record HD displays at Dallas Cowboy's stadium, the largest measuring 22 m high by 49 m wide on the sidelines. This week the company announced the installation of another enormous Diamond Vision screen, this time at Hakodate Racecourse at home in Japan.  Read More

Multiple layers of graphene are being advanced as a new solution to fight overheating in e...

Overheating in laptops and electronic gadgets isn't just an annoyance to the end user — it's a major technological hurdle that puts a hard limit to the speed and energy efficiency of electronics. In a paper recently published on the journal Nature Materials, a team of scientists from the University of California found that multiple layers of graphene show strong heat conducting properties that can be harnessed in removing dissipated heat from electronic devices.  Read More

The Boogie Board is a multi-purpose paper replacement LCD note pad which uses novel techno...

If you need something a little more responsive and modern than an Etch-a-Sketch and can't wait for a Scribble to break cover, then perhaps the Boogie Board can help. The pressure-sensitive LCD display requires no power to retain an image, and is ideal for virtually any task that requires a temporary note to be taken.  Read More

The U-Powered solar charger is a backup power source or charger for portable electronics s...

Canada's Kiwi Choice has announced the release of a strangely familiar-looking portable solar charger for mobile devices. The three-panel photovoltaic fan design first used by Solio has found its way to Kiwi's U-Powered charger. Featuring a powerful battery, LED flashlight and magnetic feet, the product also comes with multiple device connector tips for maximum compatibility.  Read More

Use the force Lu.. ah, Magnetic Suspension Device

Ever wanted to levitate a can or bottle inside an illuminated ring? Of course you have. Well, this device from Chinavasion uses the force to do just that. Unfortunately it uses force of the magnetic variety and not the Jedi kind, but the snappily named Magnetic Suspension Device is sure to be a conversation starter nonetheless.  Read More

Sony's rollable OTFT-driven OLED display

The miniaturization of electronic components has seen mobile devices shrink to the point where screen size is a major limiting factor. That could be set to change with Sony announcing it has developed a super-flexible full color OLED display which can be repeatedly wrapped around a thin cylinder while still producing moving images. Could we soon see mobile phones with pencil form factors and roll out displays?  Read More

Mitsubishi Electric installs elevators to carry 80, possibly the world's largest

If you've ever been annoyed by the impatiently waiting for an office building elevator, this might just be the perfect building for you. Each of the new elevators installed by Mitsubishi Electric in Umeda Hankyu Building’s new office area in Osaka, Japan measures 11.2 x 9.2 feet in area by 8.5 feet high (3.4m wide, 2.8m long and 2.6m high), thus allowing for a whopping 80 person capacity.  Read More

A computer bit circa 1958 from the LEO II/3 computer

The latest in our series of early technologies from Michael Bennett-Levy’s collection looks at the world’s first commercial business computer, the LEO II/3. The LEO II (short for Lyons Electronic Office) was the successor to the LEO I, which was designed by Oliver Standingford and Raymond Thompson of J. Lyons and Co. – one of the UK’s leading catering and food manufacturing companies in the first half of the 20th century.  Read More

Users of the Evoluce ONE can now scroll, rotate, stretch, shrink, or pivot in mid-air than...

Last October, Evoluce showed off its 47-inch multi-touch LCD HD display monster which can register an unlimited number of simultaneous contact points from both stylus and human touch. Not content with mere touchscreen technology, the company has now unveiled geo-spatial gesture functionality which allows users to control actions on the screen at up to a meter away.  Read More

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