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Electronics


— Electronics

Self-healing electronics may result in less expensive, longer-lasting devices

By - December 21, 2011 2 Pictures
A hard material is impregnated with microcapsules that burst when the material cracks, releasing a stored liquid that hardens on contact with the air, thus repairing the crack ... it’s a system that we’ve recently seen used in a number of applications, including self-healing concrete and polymers. Now, a research team from the University of Illinois is applying it to electronics. They have already created a system that automatically restores conductivity to a cracked circuit in just a fraction of a second. Read More
— Electronics

Augmented reality app lets you see through catalog models' clothing

By - December 13, 2011 5 Pictures
Here's an unlikely recipe for successfully spicing up a winter clothes catalog – make the models lose their clothes, or to be more exact, allow your clients to see what is hiding underneath the bulky winter garments. The X-Ray augmented reality app by clothing retailer Moosejaw does exactly that. It uses your mobile device's camera and some augmented reality trickery to grant you X-ray vision, as you scan both female and male models' bodies in the catalog. All you have to do is position your device over the catalog pages. Read More
— Electronics

BlueSpec system determines circuitry and code for electronics designers

By - December 12, 2011
Although we may think of smartphones as being like tiny desktop computers, they do have at least one key difference – in order to save battery power, many of their functions are hardwired into highly-efficient dedicated processors, instead of taking the form of software. Because smartphones perform so many functions, however, not all of them can be hardwired. As a result, designers of mobile devices must decide which functions will be handled by software, and which by hardware. Computer scientists from MIT have recently devised a system that should make those designers’ jobs a lot easier – if they’re willing to adopt it. Read More
— Electronics

World's first ultra-thin, low energy molybdenite microchip tested

By - December 6, 2011 2 Pictures
Back in February, Darren Quick wrote about the unique properties of Molybdenite and how this material, previously used mostly as a lubricant, could actually outshine silicon in the construction of transistors and other electronic circuits. In brief: it's much more energy efficient than silicon, and you can slice it into strips just three atoms thick - meaning that you can make transistors as much as three times smaller than before, and make them flexible to boot. Well, the technology has now been proven with the successful testing of the world's first molybdenite microchip in Switzerland. Does this mean Lausanne will become known as "Molybdenite Valley?" Read More
— Electronics

Roboden electrical cable stretches like human skin

By - December 6, 2011 4 Pictures
Researchers from Japanese company Asahi Kasei Fibers have developed what is claimed to be the world's first elastic electric cable. Inspired by the extensibility of human skin, the Roboden cable has been initially designed as a wiring solution for humanoid robots and wearable electronics. The stretchy cable could also find its way into personal electronics in the form of power cords or USB data cables. Read More
— Electronics

Crypteks physically lockable USB flash drive takes data protection seriously

By - December 1, 2011 11 Pictures
Crypteks is bringing out our inner Robert Langdon with the new physically lockable USB flash drive. Featuring a sleek all-metal solid-aluminum alloy construction, the Crypteks USB storage is physically locked inside its housing encrypted with a user-created password that is input by twisting five rings displaying all 26 letters of the alphabet. And if that's still not secure enough, it also offers 256-bit AES Hardware Encryption. Read More
— Electronics

Home-built privacy monitor made from an old LCD

By - November 30, 2011 8 Pictures
Many of us still keep old LCDs that should have been discarded long time ago. There might be a good reason, however, to refrain from disposing of this obsolete equipment. By following a few simple steps, anyone can turn an old LCD into a privacy monitor with contents visible only to the person wearing a pair of special glasses (also home-built), while anyone else can only see a white surface. Read More
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