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Sony's OLED PVM-740 offers picture contrast greater than a CRT display and is less affecte...

While we wait for bigger, cheaper OLED displays to knock LCD and plasmas off their perch, Sony has released the first field display to use an Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) display panel. The PVM-740 is a 7.4-inch 960 x 540 pixel resolution portable monitor designed for professional users (with professionally deep pockets) that offers picture contrast greater than a CRT display and is less affected by ambient light, allowing images to be viewed even in strong sunlight.  Read More

Existing Blu-ray discs will play in BDXL and IH-BD hardware, but BDXL and IH-BD discs will...

The dust has barely settled on the format war between HD-DVD and Blu-Ray (in which Blu-ray took the honors), but now the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) has announced two new media specs. The final specifications for BDXL (High Capacity Recordable and Rewritable discs) and IH-BD (Intra-Hybrid Blu-ray discs) are expected in the next couple of months and neither will be compatible with existing Blu-ray players – not even with a firmware update.  Read More

Fujitsu's power strip managed to bring down electrical consumption by a whopping 20%

Normally a humble power strip is the last thing I'd expect to cover here on Gizmag. But this one by Fujitsu offers a little extra. With built in power sensors, the power strips can monitor exactly how much electricity is being used in the workplace.  Read More

Sharp's new 3D display doesn't require the use of special glasses

Sharp has revealed a glasses-free 3.4in stereoscopic LCD touchscreen display for use in digital cameras, smartphones and other handheld devices. The company claims that the new screen offers the highest brightness in the industry, reduced crosstalk and can easily be switched between 2D and 3D mode.  Read More

Georgia Tech professor Zhong Lin Wang holds an improved nanogenerator containing 700 rows ...

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created the world's first self-powered sensors at the nanometric scale. Tiny generators embedding thousands of nanowires produce electricity whenever the wires are subjected to mechanical strain, and can be used to power microscopic sensors without the need for batteries.  Read More

AT&T's ZERO charger automatically detects when it is no longer needed and switches itself ...

AT&T has announced that its hoping to step into Buffy's shoes and rid the world of vampires. Just as the undead feast on the life-force of unsuspecting victims, mobile phone chargers can continue to suck power from the mains even when disconnected from the device and left in the wall socket. With the forthcoming release of the ZERO charger, AT&T is aiming to change that.  Read More

The Eyewriter project is an ongoing collaborative research effort to empower people who ar...

Members of Free Art and Technology (FAT), OpenFrameworks, the Graffiti Research Lab, and The Ebeling Group communities have teamed-up with legendary LA graffiti writer, publisher and activist Tony Quan aka Tempt One to develop a low-cost, open source eye-tracking system that will allow graffiti writers and artists with paralysis to draw using only their eyes. Their product, the Eyewriter, recently won the Interactive Award at the celebrated Brit Insurance Design Awards.  Read More

RFID tags printed through a new roll-to-roll process could replace bar codes and make chec...

Newly developed radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology could usher in the era of checkout line-free shopping. The inexpensive, printable transmitter can be invisibly embedded in packaging offering the possibility of customers walking a cartload of groceries or other goods past a scanner that would read all the items at once, total them up and charge the customer’s account while adjusting the store’s inventory. More advanced versions could even collect all the information about the contents of a store in an instant, letting a retailer know where every package is at any time.  Read More

The Epson Toyocom AH-6100LR is a six-axis quartz MEMS motion sensor

Epson Toyocom Corporation has produced what it claims is the world’s smallest 6-axis motion sensor. The use of motion sensors is growing dramatically, with the components found in all sorts of devices including cell phones, digital cameras, and of course game controllers such as the Nintendo Wii Remote or the Sony PlayStation Move. Epson Toyocom's AH-6100LR combines two different sensors in a single small package, incorporating both a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis gyro-sensor.  Read More

Transistor architecture developed by Tyndall researchers uses a control gate around a sili...

A team of scientists at the Tyndall National Institute in Cork, Ireland has created what they claim is the world's first junctionless transistor. The invention represents a breakthrough in transistors and nanoelectronics, and has the potential to revolutionize microchip manufacturing.  Read More

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