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Electronics

— Electronics

Scientists create ultra-thin, cheap, flexible, transparent graphene semiconductors

By - September 28, 2012 1 Picture
Ordinarily, electronics are made with silicon semiconductors that are rigid, opaque, and about half a millimeter thick. Thanks to research being carried out at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, however, that may be about to change. Led by Dr. Helge Weman and Prof. Bjørn-Ove Fimland, a team there has developed a method of making semiconductors out of graphene. At a thickness of just one micrometer, they are flexible and transparent. Also, because they require so little raw material, they should be considerably cheaper to manufacture than their silicon counterparts. Read More
— Electronics

"Transient electronics" dissolve once they're not needed

By - September 27, 2012 6 Pictures
We’ve certainly been hearing a lot lately about tiny electronic devices that can do things such as delivering medication after being implanted in the body, measuring structural stress upon being attached to a bridge, or monitoring pollution after being placed in the environment. In all of these cases, the device has to be retrieved once it’s served its purpose, or just left in place indefinitely. Now, however, an interdisciplinary team of researchers have demonstrated “transient electronics,” which dissolve into nothing after a pre-determined amount of time. Read More
— Electronics

TinyDuino shrinks the Arduino, retains its flexibility

By - September 27, 2012 6 Pictures
The popular open-source Arduino microcontroller has been implemented in countless projects worldwide, and this very success has led the hacker community to create several smaller and cheaper alternatives to the Arduino, such as the Digispark. TinyDuino continues in this miniaturization trend but, crucially, does so while promising to retain all the flexibility of its illustrious forbear. Read More

NES Zapper Laser packs a punch

Remember the classic NES Zapper, as used in games like Duck Hunt? Well, an intrepid tinkerer at North Street Labs hacker space in Portsmouth, Virginia, has taken that same harmless toy and retrofitted it with a powerful laser. While not quite deadly enough to take out a real life mallard, you wouldn't want to point the NES Zapper Laser toward a TV either, as it's capable of doing considerable damage to whatever it shoots. Read More
— Electronics

World's biggest multi-touch wall created with two dozen MultiTaction displays

By - September 24, 2012 4 Pictures
UK-based Engage Production has just stacked 24 MultiTaction Cell displays in the new "Executive Brand Suite" of an un-named City of London client to create the world's largest multi-touch interactive wall. Measuring some 9.9 x 3 m (32.48 x 9.84 ft), including the base, the monster installation's separate screens function as one huge touch display, capable of tracking and registering an unlimited number of simultaneous touch points. Read More
— Electronics

Multi-faceted "Tilt Display" moves (and tilts) with the times

By - September 23, 2012 6 Pictures
There are a number of different display technologies that provide the illusion of 3D images on a 2D screen. A team of researchers led by the University of Bristol has offered a new take on things by creating “Tilt Display” – a prototype screen that's split in a 3x3 configuration with the nine individual sub-screens physically moving and tilting up and down to physically represent the three dimensional content being displayed. Read More
— Electronics

Seiko Astron watch uses GPS to set the time anywhere in the world

By - September 17, 2012 6 Pictures
For the truly obsessive-compulsive who panic if their watch is even slightly off, the Seiko Astron GPS watch could be the answer. The world’s first solar-powered watch that can set the time with GPS signals, the Astron is accurate to within one second per 100,000 years and automatically adjusts to any timezone in the world. Seiko announced the release of the Astron back in March and it’s now going on sale worldwide. Read More

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