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Sony's rollable OTFT-driven OLED display

The miniaturization of electronic components has seen mobile devices shrink to the point where screen size is a major limiting factor. That could be set to change with Sony announcing it has developed a super-flexible full color OLED display which can be repeatedly wrapped around a thin cylinder while still producing moving images. Could we soon see mobile phones with pencil form factors and roll out displays?  Read More

Mitsubishi Electric installs elevators to carry 80, possibly the world's largest

If you've ever been annoyed by the impatiently waiting for an office building elevator, this might just be the perfect building for you. Each of the new elevators installed by Mitsubishi Electric in Umeda Hankyu Building’s new office area in Osaka, Japan measures 11.2 x 9.2 feet in area by 8.5 feet high (3.4m wide, 2.8m long and 2.6m high), thus allowing for a whopping 80 person capacity.  Read More

A computer bit circa 1958 from the LEO II/3 computer

The latest in our series of early technologies from Michael Bennett-Levy’s collection looks at the world’s first commercial business computer, the LEO II/3. The LEO II (short for Lyons Electronic Office) was the successor to the LEO I, which was designed by Oliver Standingford and Raymond Thompson of J. Lyons and Co. – one of the UK’s leading catering and food manufacturing companies in the first half of the 20th century.  Read More

Users of the Evoluce ONE can now scroll, rotate, stretch, shrink, or pivot in mid-air than...

Last October, Evoluce showed off its 47-inch multi-touch LCD HD display monster which can register an unlimited number of simultaneous contact points from both stylus and human touch. Not content with mere touchscreen technology, the company has now unveiled geo-spatial gesture functionality which allows users to control actions on the screen at up to a meter away.  Read More

Osram Sylvania and Artisan have announced MusicLites, a lighting solution where sound and ...

The outlook for piping music into office space or the shop floor is about to get a lot brighter. Lighting solutions company Osram Sylvania and audio innovator Artisan have teamed up to produce the MusicLites system - a 10W LED light bulb with a 70mm full range hi-fi audio speaker built in. The inclusion of a 2.4GHz wireless transceiver means that compatible audio devices can send music sound signals to the unit, which then pumps out both sound and light.  Read More

A solar cell printed on paper to spell MIT (Image: CNET)

When most people think of solar cells they picture the rigid glass panels that dot rooftops around the world. But the solar cells of the future will be much more adaptable, with researchers already succeeding in creating highly absorbing flexible solar cells that can be printed on plastic. Now researchers at MIT have gone one step further with the development of the first solar cell printed on paper.  Read More

Could a tiny piezoelectric generator provide convert enough energy from walking to power y...

Could walking or running generate enough energy to power your cell phone or GPS device? Dr. Ville Kaajakari has developed an innovative piezoelectric generator prototype small enough to be embedded in the sole of a shoe that's designed to produce enough power to operate GPS receivers, location tags and eventually, even a cell phone.  Read More

3R's A200 is a microscope in your pocket

At the Printable Electronics Exhibition in Tokyo, 3R Systems was showing off their newest model of pocket microscope, the A200. Unlike the previous Vitiny model, which shot at 300,000 pixels, the A200 has a 2 megapixel (2,000,000) CMOS sensor and kicks out images of about 1600 x 1200 pixels.  Read More

Sanyo's Xacti Sound Recorder makes copying from radio cool again

Sanyo's Xacti line-up is welcoming a new addition to the family, but this time it's not a video camera. Announced earlier this month the new Xacti sound recorder looks about as awesome as a sound recorder can possibly look, showing that the company still sees potential in the sound recorder market.  Read More

Medea vodka bottles have an LED ticker on them to help 'get your message across'

You’re in a nightclub and spy a ridiculously good-looking member of the opposite sex across a crowded room. And while that person seems unattached, your delivery of pick-up lines is appalling (obvious from your lack of partners). So, what do you do? You grab your high-tech bottle of Medea vodka, pull up a chair at the person's table let them read your “message on a bottle”. Honestly, I can’t think of another reason for having an LED ticker on bottle. “Happy birthday” doesn’t cut it, nor does "Hello, my name is ... ", but for the shy or clumsy, a well though-out digital message could be just the thing to get you over the line. The only problem is … you need to be sober to program the darn thing.  Read More

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