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Greg Dawe demonstrates the HUVR device that lets users see and 'feel' 3D images

It’s not uncommon to see children attempt to reach out and touch objects the first time they don 3D glasses and sit down in front of a 3D TV. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a new virtual reality device that enables users to do just that. The relatively low-cost device called the Heads-Up Virtual Reality device (HUVR) combines a consumer 3D HDTV panel and a touch-feedback (haptic) device to enable users not only to see a 3D image, but “feel” it too.  Read More

Write for Gizmag

July 27, 2010
Write for Gizmag

Gizmag is seeking editorial contributors in the New York area. Applicants need to be able to recognize significant developments in the technology space, initiate stories, be self-motivated, work autonomously and be capable of delivering high-quality, authoritative original content in a fast paced online team environment.  Read More

Fujitsu's new resistive multi-touch panel detects finger and stylus input simultaneously

Fujitsu has announced the release of multi-input resistive touch panels with the ability to detect simultaneous inputs. This means that potentially you could have input coming from your finger and from a stylus at the very same time. While multi-touch is nothing new to most readers (especially those with a taste for Apple products), it should be clarified that this functionality is normally associated with capacitive touch screens and not resistive panels like these new ones from Fujitsu.  Read More

Test facility for nanowicks (Image: Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering)

An advanced cooling technology being developed for high-power electronics in military and automotive systems is capable of handling roughly 10 times the heat generated by conventional computer chips. The new type of cooling system can be used to prevent overheating of devices called insulated gate bipolar transistors, high-power switching transistors used in hybrid and electric vehicles. The chips are required to drive electric motors, switching large amounts of power from the battery pack to electrical coils needed to accelerate a vehicle from zero to 60 mph in 10 seconds or less.  Read More

Sharp's new BD-HDW700 and BD-HDW70 Blu-ray disc recorders and VR-100BR1 media will be the ...

In April this year, the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) announced the final specifications for the new multi-layer recordable Blu-ray Disc format which can more than double the storage capacity of existing 50GB dual layer discs. The new BDXL format supports rewritable discs of up to 100GB and 128GB for write-once recordable discs. Looks like Sharp gets to claim bragging rights as the first company to release both media and hardware that supports the new standard – two new BDXL compatible AQUOS Blu-ray Disc recorders, as well as 100GB write-once BDXL format media to the Japanese market this month.  Read More

Min-Feng Yu, a professor of mechanical science and engineering, has developed a novel appr...

The miniaturization of electronics has seen the wiring of connections between chips and circuit boards become a substantial obstacle. Such connections are traditionally made from pre-fabricated metal wires that connect to a designated bonding pad on a chip. However, many microelectronic devices are much smaller than the required 50-by-50 micron square bonding site, prohibiting integrated functions on a very small scale. Engineers at the University of Illinois have now developed a novel direct-writing method for manufacturing metal interconnects that could enable the further shrinking of integrated circuits and expand microelectronics.  Read More

The power strip from Wet Circuits features a water resistant design and special material p...

Accidentally spilling a cup of coffee over a power strip will, at best, probably cause the connected equipment to stop working. On the other hand, such water-related electrical mishaps could lead to serious injury or even be fatal for the user. Wet Circuits has introduced a water resistant power strip that looks to avoid such situations by protecting internal wiring and minimizing the flow of electricity upon contact with water.  Read More

Microsoft InstaLoad lets you insert batteries in any direction

For batteries to work, they need to go in the right way. It's one of those fundamental rules that we all pick up from an early age, but Microsoft has just announced an innovation that turns all that on its head – literally. Known as "InstaLoad" battery installation, the technology allows you to insert a battery without having to worry about positive and negative polarity. That's idiot-proofing of the highest order!  Read More

The URWERK UR-CC1 Black Cobra

Known to Gizmag readers for its outlandish timepieces, Swiss watchmaker URWERK's latest offering – the UR-CC1 Black Cobra – definitely falls into the “cool watch” category. Made from titanium and gold treated with aluminum titane nitride to achieve the black coloration, the Cobra shows the time via two linearly-progressing bars that indicate the hour and minute, and a dual clockwork/numeric seconds display.  Read More

One of the Fraunhofer fiber optic films

LEDs... is there anything they can’t do? Well yes, actually, there is. They can’t be something other than a point light source. That’s not ideal when it comes to flat – and increasingly thin – displays such as television and cell phone screens. How does one go about converting that three-dimensional point light source into a two-dimensional display, without losing much of its intensity? The answer could be found in a new machine that efficiently and inexpensively produces fiber optic film sheets.  Read More

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