Computational creativity and the future of AI

Electronics

Hop! promises to free travelers from carrying their luggage

As any frequent flyer knows, hauling around a passport, carry-on luggage and suitcase while navigating through an airport can be a real hassle, and the situation is made worse if the traveler in question has any physical health issues. Madrid-based designer Rodrigo Garcia Gonzalez has come up with an ingenious solution to this issue: a smart carry-on suitcase named Hop! which follows the traveler around automatically.  Read More

Simon Burfield has created a wheelchair from LEGO Technic and Mindstorms components and so...

Back in June we demonstrated the incredible versatility of LEGO and the mind-boggling talent of those who spend hours and hours snapping together tiny bits of plastic to create something awesome. One contender for the next round is the LEGO Wheelchair built by Simon Burfield.  Read More

The 3M Streaming Projector is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand

The world seems to be moving away from projectors. Almost all of the tech-savvy consumer's content is downloaded digitally and streamed to TVs, tablets and smartphones. The projector is kind of lost in the shuffle of all of this. Enter 3M's Streaming Projector, which merges the massive display sizes that only a projector can produce, with the streaming content for which Roku is known.  Read More

The Harmony Touch has less buttons and a 2.4-inch swipe and tap touchscreen

Logitech has just revealed its latest universal remote, the Harmony Touch. It marks the first big shift in the company's Harmony remotes in quite some time, and is designed to simplify some of the complicated controls that came with previous models.  Read More

The Moo NFC business card offers users a more alluring experience than manually typing in ...

UK-based printing company Moo has given its business cards a post-smartphone remix by creating a design which imbeds a near-field communication (NFC) chip within, enabling it to interact with NFC-equipped smartphones.  Read More

A rendering of the gallium/arsenic nanowires on the graphene substrate

Ordinarily, electronics are made with silicon semiconductors that are rigid, opaque, and about half a millimeter thick. Thanks to research being carried out at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, however, that may be about to change. Led by Dr. Helge Weman and Prof. Bjørn-Ove Fimland, a team there has developed a method of making semiconductors out of graphene. At a thickness of just one micrometer, they are flexible and transparent. Also, because they require so little raw material, they should be considerably cheaper to manufacture than their silicon counterparts.  Read More

3D-printed objects created using LAYWOO-D3

Usually when we think of materials that can be used in 3D printers, we think of substances that can be melted, like plastic or resin. What we don't think of is wood. Nonetheless, a new product allows users to create 3D-printed wooden objects ... depending on how you define “wooden.”  Read More

A biodegradable integrated circuit during dissolution in water (Photo: Beckman Institute, ...

We’ve certainly been hearing a lot lately about tiny electronic devices that can do things such as delivering medication after being implanted in the body, measuring structural stress upon being attached to a bridge, or monitoring pollution after being placed in the environment. In all of these cases, the device has to be retrieved once it’s served its purpose, or just left in place indefinitely. Now, however, an interdisciplinary team of researchers have demonstrated “transient electronics,” which dissolve into nothing after a pre-determined amount of time.  Read More

Both the TinyDuino and TinyLily Mini are significantly smaller than, but compatible with, ...

The popular open-source Arduino microcontroller has been implemented in countless projects worldwide, and this very success has led the hacker community to create several smaller and cheaper alternatives to the Arduino, such as the Digispark. TinyDuino continues in this miniaturization trend but, crucially, does so while promising to retain all the flexibility of its illustrious forbear.  Read More

A hacker has retrofitted a classic NES Zapper with a powerful laser, resulting in a gun th...

Remember the classic NES Zapper, as used in games like Duck Hunt? Well, an intrepid tinkerer at North Street Labs hacker space in Portsmouth, Virginia, has taken that same harmless toy and retrofitted it with a powerful laser. While not quite deadly enough to take out a real life mallard, you wouldn't want to point the NES Zapper Laser toward a TV either, as it's capable of doing considerable damage to whatever it shoots.  Read More

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