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Eruption of Kilauea Volcano at Mauna Ulu, February - March 1974 (Image: National Park Serv...

New technology using silicon carbide electronics could enable radio transmitters that can withstand temperatures of up to 900 degrees Celsius (1,652 F). No, it’s not being developed so listeners can enjoy their favorite breakfast DJ in a worst-case global warming scenario. Rather the team behind the research envisions devices that could be dropped into the depths of the earth to provide early warning of a volcanic eruption or to provide real time data from the inside of a jet engine or nuclear power plant.  Read More

The MultiAccount and Hidden credit cards possible with the Card 2.0 technology (Image: Dyn...

If you’re anything like me, there’s a stack of credit cards bulking up the size of your wallet (or purse), making it fit to burst in a Costanza-like explosion of receipts and unused condoms. New technology from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania startup Dynamics Inc. could help cut the number of cards cluttering up your wallet by allowing you to access multiple credit card accounts on a single card. To enhance security, the technology also allows the credit card number that appears on the front of a card to be hidden until the correct code is entered.  Read More

Sensors sprinkled throughout the home beam information at a set frequency. Wiring wrapped ...

Smart homes of the future will automatically adapt to their surroundings using an array of sensors to record everything from the building’s temperature and humidity to the light level and air quality. One hurdle impeding the development of such intelligent homes is the fact that existing technology is still power hungry and today’s wireless devices either transmit a signal only several feet, or consume so much energy they need frequent battery replacements. Researchers have now developed sensors that run on extremely low power thanks to using a home’s electrical wiring as a giant antenna to transmit information.  Read More

The Gesture Remote offers users spatial gesture access and control of content on a TV

How many device remotes do you have? One for the TV, one for the DVD/Blu-ray player, one for cable/satellite box, one for the hi-fi and perhaps even one for the computer – have I missed any? Maybe you've tried to consolidate all of these various remotes into one big universal control with lots and lots of buttons. The Gesture Remote offers something a bit different. The simple interface is completely free of buttons and spatial thumb gestures are used to access menus and choose content.  Read More

Philips demonstrates world's first 230V AC-powered white-light OLED module (Image: Philips...

As well as the super-thin, next-generation TV’s we’re all looking forward to, organic light emitting diodes, or OLEDs, also hold great potential as a light source. They are extremely energy efficient, dimmable, can produce many different colors, emit light over an extended area and the light they produce is diffuse and non-glaring. The thin, flat nature of OLEDs also makes it possible to create light sources in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. However, until now, the physical characteristics of OLEDs have meant they have had to be powered from low-voltage direct current (DC) sources. Philips Research has now developed the first ever OLED module that can be powered directly from a mains electricity supply.  Read More

Sanyo has unveiled a Japanese launch for a new eneloop waist warmer, an updated neck warme...

With the cold winter months approaching fast, Sanyo has announced the release of a new eneloop universe waist warmer in Japan. Taking the form of an adjustable belt, the warmth to belly and waist is provided by a thin film heater unit powered by a mobile booster. The company has also given its neck warmer an update to make it easier to use and added a new twin set of eneloop kairo hand warmers.  Read More

The HP Photosmart Wireless All-in-One B110

Earlier this year, Gizmag attended the Asia-Pacific press launch of HP’s web-connected printers. At the time we were hopeful that the company’s ePrint technology which, amongst other things, allows users to print documents by sending an email, would help cut down on printer hassles stemming from pesky printer drivers. After spending a bit of time with the HP Photosmart Wireless e-All-in-One Printer B110 we’re still hopeful for the future of cloud-based printing, but it seems there are still some kinks that need to be ironed out.  Read More

The new dual-row pin memory card design

The SD Association is celebrating ten years this year and it used Europe's largest consumer electronics show – IFA – to announce a new, dual-row pin memory card design with data transfer speeds of up to 300 megabytes per second for SDXC and SDHC devices and memory cards. It is fully backwards compatible, allowing equipped devices full use of any SD, SDHC and SDXC memory cards and will be part of the forthcoming SD 4.0 specification, expected in early 2011.  Read More

Sanyo is about to add some new additions to its eneloop universe series of portable power ...

Since introducing its eneloop rechargeable battery technology in 2005, Sanyo is reported to have shipped over 130 million cells. Now the company has announced some new additions to its eneloop universe series which provide a power boost to a host of mobile devices including Apple's iPad, Sony's Xperia smartphone and Nintendo's DS series portable gaming devices.  Read More

Researchers from the University of Michigan have unveiled a more efficient, brighter and h...

Only a small percentage of backlight actually makes its way out through the multiple layers that make up the ubiquitous LCD displays we use today. That may change with the development of new filter technology at the University of Michigan. White light is sent through tiny, precisely spaced gaps on nano-thin sheets of aluminum and is said to result in brighter, higher definition color reproduction. Other benefits of the technology include efficiency gains and simpler manufacturing.  Read More

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