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Electronics

GoldMoney uses GE's ultrasound scanning technology to ensure the integrity of its gold hol...

Evidently all that glitters is not entirely gold. Just ask the many disappointed bankers and investors who have discovered some of their large gold bullion bars were ersatz - real gold on the outside, far less valuable tungsten on the inside. Enter General Electric with its Phasor series of portable ultrasonic detectors. Using non-invasive technology identical to that deployed in peering at developing fetuses, GE's devices allow a quick and thorough examination of gold bars for flaws, bubbles and even different materials.  Read More

Vision Research's Phantom v1610 high-speed digital camera shoots 1 million fps videos

Vision Research has revealed the latest addition to its line of digital high-speed cameras, in the form of the Phantom v1610. It shoots videos at an impressive speed of 16,000 fps, at a resolution of 1280 x 800. However, if the number of pixels is reduced to just 128 x 16, the speed can be increased to a whopping 1 million frames recorded every second. While that's less than the X-ray camera that shoots at 4.5 million fps, the Phantom v1610 is not a scientific one-of-a-kind device.  Read More

MiniDock is compatible with iPhone and iPod enabling to plug them virtually directly into ...

Charging an iPhone or iPod when out and about can often leave users taking advantage of any spare power outlet at hand. For those using the standard adapter and cable that came with said devices, this can sometimes mean leaving the units laying on the ground at the mercy of any big booted passersby. Bluelounge's MiniDock charging adapter overcomes this problem by replacing the dangling cable with a dock that connects directly to the standard Apple USB power adapter so that your mobile device sits upright close to the wall, safely out of harm's way.  Read More

A RotoSub ANC-enabled fan inside an air flow distributor to demonstrate its noise-cancelli...

Silicon chips shuffling all those electrons around inside modern PCs, gaming consoles and home theater systems generate a lot of heat that needs to be dissipated to stop the machines going into meltdown and ruining your day. Fans are the most common form of cooling for modern electronic devices but they can generate a lot of noise that can leave your lounge room or study sounding like an airport runway. Sweden-based company RotoSub has developed an active noise control (ANC) system that is built into the fans themselves that promises to almost eliminate the fan’s mechanical noise and leave little more than the sound of the air blowing through the fan.  Read More

.NET Gadgeteer's sample camera built by Nicholas Villar

DIY gadgets' makers have a new solution for quick and easy building of custom devices in the form of the .NET Gadgeteer platform. Utilizing .NET Micro Framework and C# programming language, .NET Gadgeteer is an open-source toolkit combined of a basic ARM CPU-equipped mainboard and a choice of easily attachable modules, including displays, buttons, camera, Ethernet, USB ports, or WiFi. The idea resembles the Arduino platform or EZ-Builder kit for DIY robotics projects like DJ Sures' WALL-E.  Read More

Spanish researchers have developed an electronic tongue capable of distinguishing between ...

Spanish efforts to find an electronic alternative to the tried and tested expertise of a human sommelier have now resulted in a system that can tell the difference between varieties of sparkling wine. The new development combines advanced mathematical processing tools with chemical measurement systems and an artificial neural network to create an electronic tongue currently capable of identifying the characteristics of just three cava wines, but with the potential to learn all types available on the market.  Read More

Postdoctoral researcher Yu Zhu with the graphene-based hybrid film on a flexible plastic s...

Graphene promises to revolutionize electronics but we’re still waiting for graphene-based technologies to hit the market. Rice University researchers have now created transparent, graphene-based electrodes that they say could be the “killer app” that finally puts graphene into the commercial spotlight. The graphene-based electrodes could be used to replace the increasingly expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) in touch-screen displays, photovoltaic solar cells and LED lighting.  Read More

Researchers at MIT have developed sun-free photovoltaics (Photo: Justin Knight)

MIT researchers have reported a breakthrough in "wavelength tuning" that promises to boost the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems and in turn could lead to lighter, longer-lasting portable power sources.  Read More

Cellular-based automotive systems such as BMW Assist have been hacked by a pair of securit...

Cellular-based automotive roadside assistance services like GM’s OnStar and BMW Assist allow remote unlocking of vehicles by communicating with remote servers via standard mobile networks. Now a pair of security systems engineers have managed to prove it takes just a few hours of clever reverse engineering to crack the in-car cellular network-based technology to gain access to vehicles. They call their method “War Texting.”  Read More

MIT researchers have further improved the energy density of lithium-air batteries (Image: ...

Last year MIT researchers reported improving the efficiency of lithium-air batteries through the use of electrodes with gold or platinum catalysts. MIT News is now reporting that in a continuation of that work, researchers have been able to further increase the energy storage capacity of lithium-air batteries for a given weight by creating carbon-fiber-based electrodes.  Read More

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