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Electronics

— Electronics

Luxor 2 flashlight automatically detects targets, adjusts beam for ideal illumination

Although most modern flashlights provide the means to adjust beam focus and brightness, very few are equally effective at both flood- and spot-lighting. You could own one of each flashlight type, but the latest from PLX Devices takes a different approach. Not only is the Luxor 2 designed for optimal light delivery, it does so automatically by detecting where it's being pointed in order to adjust the beam accordingly.

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New silicon-based anode set to boost lifetime and capacity of lithium-ion batteries

A new approach developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo could hold the key to greatly improving the performance of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The scientists have developed a new type of silicon anode that would be used in place of a conventional graphite anode, which they claim will lead to smaller, lighter and longer-lasting batteries for everything from personal devices to electric vehicles.

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ePint boasts better toasts by glowing when your team scores

To some, sports is just that. Sports. But to many more all over the world, watching games and supporting players is part pastime, part culture, and maybe even part religion (e.g. Wisconsin's Green Bay Packers). Out of all the ways to show love and loyalty for one's favorite team(s) – from simple signs to full-on body paint/costumes – the latest may be the most flashy. The ePint Smart Beer Mug is designed to automatically light up in your team's colors every single time they score.

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New research points the way to biodegradable displays

Electronic waste is a huge environmental problem, causing harm to the planet and human health because of the toxic materials used. While this situation is unlikely to change in the near future, there has been research on using materials that biodegrade. More recently, scientists have demonstrated a new route to creating biodegradable electronics by using organic components in screen displays.

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HyperCam would let you see the unseen

Because regular cameras just process visible light, the images that they produce look like what we see with our own eyes. By contrast, hyperspectral cameras process additional wavelengths, showing us things that we wouldn't otherwise be able to see. Unfortunately, they also tend to be big, expensive, and thus limited to scientific or industrial applications. That could be about to change, however, as scientists from the University of Washington and Microsoft Research are creating a compact, inexpensive consumer hyperspectral camera. It may even find its way into your smartphone.

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— Electronics

Powered by body heat, Lumen flashlight never needs batteries

Whether it be for everyday carry, outdoor adventure, or disaster preparation, flashlights tend to be found towards the top of must-have items. But one common aspect of these luminescent devices is that they're only as good as the batteries inside. If you've ever switched on a flashlight only to experience a flood of frustrated disappointment, you might appreciate owning an "eternal flashlight." Lumen is designed to be powered by body heat, never needing batteries.

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Breakthrough rectenna converts light into DC current

Rectifying antennas – "rectennas" – are used as parasitic power capture devices that absorb radio frequency (RF) energy and convert it into usable electrical power. Constructing such devices to absorb and rectify at optical wavelengths has proved impractical in the past, but the advent of carbon nanotubes and advances in microscopic manufacturing technology have allowed engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology to create rectennas that capture and convert light to direct electrical current. The researchers believe that their creation may eventually help double the efficiency of solar energy harvesting.

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Portobella mushrooms improve battery recipe

The number of electric vehicles and mobile devices is expected to surge over the coming decade, which would place considerable strain on our environment and resources as far as battery technology currently stands. In an effort to find more sustainable alternatives for battery materials, researchers from the University of California, Riverside have created a battery incorporating the skins of portabella mushrooms. The move not only has the potential to reduce the economic and environmental cost of battery production, but may also result in batteries whose capacity increases over time.


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