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Electronics

Researchers at Purdue University have shown how standard inkjet-printers can be employed to produce flexible electronic circuits from liquid-metal nanoparticle inks. This simple printing solution promises faster, cheaper, and easier production of stretchable, bendable electronics for clothing, soft robotics, and wearable devices. Read More
Researchers at Stanford University have created a fast-charging and long-lasting rechargeable battery that is inexpensive to produce, and which they claim could replace many of the lithium-ion and alkaline batteries powering our gadgets today. The prototype aluminum-ion battery is also safer, not bursting into flames as some of its lithium-ion brethren are wont to do. Read More
Philips has announced that it plans to make 110,000 LED street lights in Los Angeles connected. The company will bring the lights online using new plug-and-play CityTouch technology. It is said to be quick and easy to install, and will allow the city's lights to be monitored and controlled via the web. Read More
As if smartphones can't already do enough, soon they may be able to scan three-dimensional objects and send the resultant high-resolution 3D images to a 3D printer that produces hyper-accurate replicas. This comes thanks to a small and inexpensive device called a nanophotonic coherent imager (NCI), which was developed by scientists at Caltech. The NCI could add 3D imaging to a variety of other devices and applications such as improving motion sensitivity in human machine interfaces and driverless cars. Read More
If you've never used a 3D printer, then you might not be aware of the fact that the objects they create don't always emerge in their final, flawless form. They often contain small printing errors, fringes of stray material, and supporting structures that need to be removed. Retouch3D uses heat to melt away those imperfections. Read More
Tiko, a new budget 3D printer seeking funding through Kickstarter, takes a number of interesting design choices to minimize costs without sacrificing the quality of the print – chief among these is the use of a cheap, single-part "unibody" frame that requires very little calibration. Read More
Flash storage technology will soon see a three-fold improvement in data density thanks to a joint development at Intel and Micron that will allow the production of 3.5 TB flash sticks and 10 TB standard-sized SSDs. Meanwhile, a new 48-layer cell technology development by Toshiba could pave the way for higher write speeds, more reliability and lower costs in solid state drives. Read More
In two claimed firsts, researchers at the University of Manchester have produced both the first commercial application of graphene and the world's first graphene light-bulb. It is expected that this new device will have lower energy emissions, cheaper manufacturing costs, and a longer running life than even LED lights. And this isn't just a pie-in-the-sky prototype, either. The team who developed it believes that the graphene light-bulb will be available for retail sale within months. Read More
Moving media between iOS devices for sharing or backup storage can be a hassle, especially without an internet connection. The iKlips, the first dual (USB and Lightning) flash drive to feature a USB 3.0 connector, promises to make things easier (and faster than the competition) by offering a faster, more convenient way to store and exchange files between iOS devices, Macs and PCs. Read More
New Mexico's multi-touch hardware and software company Ideum has launched its fastest, most expandable, and most versatile multitouch table, the Pro Lab. The active 3D LED LCD touch display boasts a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels and sits atop a computer-packing pedestal with up to 24 terabytes of removable storage. Read More
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