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Electronics

Using layers of graphene, scientists claim to have created a photodetector that converts l...

Converting light to electricity is one of the pillars of modern electronics, with the process essential for the operation of everything from solar cells and TV remote control receivers through to laser communications and astronomical telescopes. These devices rely on the swift and effective operation of this technology, especially in scientific equipment, to ensure the most efficient conversion rates possible. In this vein, researchers from the Institute of Photonic Sciences (Institut de Ciències Fotòniques/ICFO) in Barcelona have demonstrated a graphene-based photodetector they claim converts light into electricity in less than 50 quadrillionths of a second.  Read More

NuPrime's USB-powered, high resolution, portable DAC and headphone amp, the uDSD

When a high-end audio maker announces a new product, a high price tag is almost guaranteed to accompany its release. Indeed, NuPrime Audio's amps, preamps, DACs and heaphone amps are usually found in the four figure range, but not its new uDSD. The high resolution digital-to-analog converter and headphone amp will retail for under two hundred bucks.  Read More

A prototype of the loop heat pipe (Photo: Fujitsu)

Although there definitely are liquid-cooled PCs, there just isn't room for such cooling systems within smartphones – or at least, there hasn't been until now. Fujitsu recently announced development of a loop heat pipe that's less than one millimeter thick, which could help future mobile devices to keep their cool.  Read More

The Diamond Hotend is a new type of 3D printer extruder that prints in multiple colors fro...

Entrepreneurs in Denmark have taken another step towards improving the general usability of 3D printers with the Diamond Hotend, a single 3D extruder unit that can mix and melt three filaments together and produce items in a rainbow of colors.  Read More

Using a standard inkjet-printer, researchers claim to be able to produce flexible electron...

Researchers at Purdue University have shown how standard inkjet-printers can be employed to produce flexible electronic circuits from liquid-metal nanoparticle inks. This simple printing solution promises faster, cheaper, and easier production of stretchable, bendable electronics for clothing, soft robotics, and wearable devices.  Read More

The prototype aluminum-ion battery is fast-recharging, flexible and safe (Photo: Stanford ...

Researchers at Stanford University have created a fast-charging and long-lasting rechargeable battery that is inexpensive to produce, and which they claim could replace many of the lithium-ion and alkaline batteries powering our gadgets today. The prototype aluminum-ion battery is also safer, not bursting into flames as some of its lithium-ion brethren are wont to do.  Read More

Los Angeles will reduce its street lighting energy consumption by up to 70 percent, by swi...

Philips has announced that it plans to make 110,000 LED street lights in Los Angeles connected. The company will bring the lights online using new plug-and-play CityTouch technology. It is said to be quick and easy to install, and will allow the city's lights to be monitored and controlled via the web.  Read More

A tiny, cheap chip may soon bring 3D imaging to smartphones, robotics, and many other area...

As if smartphones can't already do enough, soon they may be able to scan three-dimensional objects and send the resultant high-resolution 3D images to a 3D printer that produces hyper-accurate replicas. This comes thanks to a small and inexpensive device called a nanophotonic coherent imager (NCI), which was developed by scientists at Caltech. The NCI could add 3D imaging to a variety of other devices and applications such as improving motion sensitivity in human machine interfaces and driverless cars.  Read More

Retouch3D melts away flaws on a variety of 3D-printed materials

If you've never used a 3D printer, then you might not be aware of the fact that the objects they create don't always emerge in their final, flawless form. They often contain small printing errors, fringes of stray material, and supporting structures that need to be removed. Retouch3D uses heat to melt away those imperfections.  Read More

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