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Ducati announces wireless airbag jackets for riders and passengers

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March 24, 2014

Ducati's Multistrada D-Air, with wireless airbag jackets.

Ducati's Multistrada D-Air, with wireless airbag jackets.

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Ducati has announced a new version of its stunning Multistrada 1200 sports-tourer (check out our video review) that wirelessly inflates airbag jackets for both rider and passenger in the event of a crash. A step forward from the motorcycle airbag Honda showcased in its Goldwing series, the Ducati system can protect the rider and passenger even once they’ve separated from the bike.

Motorcycle clothing company Dainese has been experimenting with suit-mounted airbags since 2008 – its D-Air system is already available in Race and Street versions. The Race version pops out of the collar to protect neck, shoulders and collarbones, and the Street version is a much larger bag that protects the wearer’s entire torso, front and back.

These systems activate in a slide or a crash, using data from a bike-mounted control box to decide when it’s time to pull the pin. That’s a lot better than other systems that need you to separate from the bike and pull a release cord to activate.

Ducati's Multistrada D-Air, with wireless airbag jackets.

The news here is that Ducati and Dainese have teamed up to build the D-Air system (presumably the Street version) into the already impressive electronics of the Ducati Multistrada 1200, and release a special D-Air edition for European riders only.

The airbag jackets will inflate in a very quick 45 milliseconds, enough to give excellent core body protection in most crash situations, and the on-bike control system can operate both rider and pillion jackets in an emergency.

I’m not sure I’d want to be a pillion behind a rider whose jacket airbag is going off as it could be a bit of an ejector seat experience. But then, if it’s the Street system they’re going to use, it might not be too intrusive.

Ducati plans to release more information on April 15. In the meantime, you can check video of the D-Air Street system inflating below.

Source: Ducati UK

About the Author
Loz Blain Loz has been one of Gizmag's most versatile contributors since 2007. Joining the team as a motorcycle specialist, he has since covered everything from medical and military technology to aeronautics, music gear and historical artefacts. Since 2010 he's branched out into photography, video and audio production, and he remains the only Gizmag contributor willing to put his name to a sex toy review. A singer by night, he's often on the road with his a cappella band Suade.   All articles by Loz Blain
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3 Comments

Wireless is a big improvement. Being Ducati/Audi not sure us masses could afford it though? Technology should filter down in a few years with other brands though.

Motorcycles are ending up so complex with so many computer boxes. Many of us aging codgers prefer the simplicity & light weight of the past though. How many will use (wisely) more than a portion of 150 h.p. plus?

chidrbmt
25th March, 2014 @ 12:58 pm PDT

I once owned a Ducati. Worst bike I ever rode. Would never buy another.

JAT
25th March, 2014 @ 01:13 pm PDT

Just two teensy problems here - First, you'll never find one big enough if you live in Hong Kong (for some strange reason, the largest off-the-peg size you'll find here is around an XL in western attire...), then there's the electronic initiation - NO...!

I have a cable-operated version of this (made in Singapore, tough as old boots and half the price), which has never inflated itself accidentally - despite the occasional borderline tug when you dismount without unhooking - but would I trust the electronics on a new bike Not to trigger one of these whenever it got wet, warm or just plain irritated - in an Italian kind of way...?

Would you...?

Nick Herbert
31st March, 2014 @ 02:11 am PDT
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