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Digital Cameras


— Digital Cameras

Canon bounces back with the EOS 1D Mark IV

By - October 21, 2009 3 Pictures
Canon didn't allow Nikon to enjoy the limelight for too long after all, announcing the forthcoming release of its new EOS 1D Mark IV professional D-SLR camera before the fanfare that accompanied Nikon's D3S had even died down. As well as slightly improving the huge ISO range of the D3S, Canon looks to have seized the opportunity to further raise the standard a little by opting for a 16.1 Mp sensor and 1080p high definition video. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Nikon D3S DSLR - fast autofocus, HD video and six figure ISO sensitivity

By - October 16, 2009 7 Pictures
Nikon seems to have once again raised the professional digital photography bar with details emerging of the upcoming D3S DSLR. Rather than try to wow with megapixels, the company hopes that excellent noise reduction and a huge ISO sensitivity range will better serve its customers. The new camera also boasts low light capable HD video, fast and accurate autofocus, a burst frame rate of 9fps and in-camera RAW image editing. Read More
— Digital Cameras

New Flip MinoHD announced

By - October 15, 2009 0 Pictures
Of Amazon's top five selling camcorders, versions of the Flip take four of the slots. The 4Gb MinoHD holds fourth position, but things never stand still for too long in the world of gadgetry and the MinoHD has just been supercharged. The second generation model features more memory, a bigger viewing screen with better resolution and a more powerful lens. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Memory chips could lead the way to gigapixel cameras

By - October 14, 2009 0 Pictures
Image sensors embedded in digital cameras are expensive, and issues with their circuitry limit the quality and resolution in the pictures they produce. Now a research group from the Netherlands believes a cheaper solution could be right before our eyes - the team's "gigavision" technique exploits the high light sensitivity of memory chips to produce inexpensive gigapixel sensors that perform very well, especially in extreme lighting conditions. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Using radio waves to ‘see’ through walls

By - October 12, 2009 0 Pictures
University of Utah engineers have developed a system that uses a wireless network of radio transmitters to track people moving behind solid walls. They say the system could help police, firefighters and other emergency services capture intruders, and rescue hostages, fire victims or elderly people who fall in their homes by letting them know where to focus their attentions. The engineers’ system uses radio tomographic imaging (RTI) to “see”, locate and track people or objects in an area surrounded by inexpensive radio transceivers that send and receive signals. Read More
— Digital Cameras

That's him, officer - the Police sketch artist evolves

By - October 6, 2009 0 Pictures
Human memory is a notoriously unreliable thing that can be easily influenced. That’s good news for criminals and bad news for law enforcement agencies that often rely on eyewitnesses to provide a description of a criminal. Around the world, law enforcement agencies employ sketch artists to piece together faces in a process similar to assembling a Mr. Potato Head toy. The witness describes key features, such as hair length, nose size or sharpness of the chin, and the artist combines them to create a likeness. Research into psychology suggests that this kind of method doesn’t take into account how the memory actually works, so researchers have developed new software that helps witnesses recreate and recognize suspects using principles borrowed from the fields of optics and genetics. Read More
— Digital Cameras

An electron microscope that won't destroy living cells

By - October 6, 2009 0 Pictures
Instead of light, traditional high-resolution electron microscopes use a particle beam of electrons to illuminate a specimen. However, the particle beam also destroys the samples, meaning that electron microscopes can’t be used to image living cells. Electrical engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have proposed a new scheme that can overcome this critical limitation by using a quantum mechanical measurement technique that allows electrons to sense objects remotely without ever hitting the imaged objects, thus avoiding damage. Read More
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