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Digital Cameras

Toshiba announces new sensitive 14.6 megapixel CMOS sensor

Toshiba has announced a 14.6 megapixel CMOS sensor for mobile phones and digital cameras which it says will boost light sensitivity and absorption by up to 40 percent. Whereas conventional sensors have multi-layer wiring sandwiched between the lenses and light receiving substrate, Toshiba has moved the wiring out of the way and placed the lenses and the photodiodes together.Read More

Pentax gets colorful with Korejanai K-x D-SLR

Black may not be the new black in the world of digital SLR cameras. Last month Pentax announced its intention to add a splash of color by offering its new K-x camera in white, red and blue as well as black. Now the company has announced a very colorful limited edition K-x based on the design of the popular Korejanai robot.Read More

Sony DPP-F700 photo frame with built-in printer

Sony has announced a new addition to its S-Frame family of digital photo frames. The DPP-F700 7-inch model includes a printer that takes 45 seconds to produce a 6 x 4-inch photo. It also features simple photo editing functions and lets you create custom calendars via the device interface.Read More

Canon bounces back with the EOS 1D Mark IV

Canon didn't allow Nikon to enjoy the limelight for too long after all, announcing the forthcoming release of its new EOS 1D Mark IV professional D-SLR camera before the fanfare that accompanied Nikon's D3S had even died down. As well as slightly improving the huge ISO range of the D3S, Canon looks to have seized the opportunity to further raise the standard a little by opting for a 16.1 Mp sensor and 1080p high definition video.Read More

Nikon D3S DSLR - fast autofocus, HD video and six figure ISO sensitivity

Nikon seems to have once again raised the professional digital photography bar with details emerging of the upcoming D3S DSLR. Rather than try to wow with megapixels, the company hopes that excellent noise reduction and a huge ISO sensitivity range will better serve its customers. The new camera also boasts low light capable HD video, fast and accurate autofocus, a burst frame rate of 9fps and in-camera RAW image editing.Read More

JVC enters HD pocket video market with 1080p capable PICSIO GC-FM1

With the release of its first pocket camcorder, the Picsio GC-FM1, JVC is no doubt hoping to chip away some of the success enjoyed by the Flip family. On paper JVC's effort appears to be a powerful little device - it produces full 1080p HD video, has 4x digital zoom and an 8Mp still camera. Read More

New Flip MinoHD announced

Of Amazon's top five selling camcorders, versions of the Flip take four of the slots. The 4Gb MinoHD holds fourth position, but things never stand still for too long in the world of gadgetry and the MinoHD has just been supercharged. The second generation model features more memory, a bigger viewing screen with better resolution and a more powerful lens.Read More

Memory chips could lead the way to gigapixel cameras

Image sensors embedded in digital cameras are expensive, and issues with their circuitry limit the quality and resolution in the pictures they produce. Now a research group from the Netherlands believes a cheaper solution could be right before our eyes - the team's "gigavision" technique exploits the high light sensitivity of memory chips to produce inexpensive gigapixel sensors that perform very well, especially in extreme lighting conditions.Read More

Using radio waves to ‘see’ through walls

University of Utah engineers have developed a system that uses a wireless network of radio transmitters to track people moving behind solid walls. They say the system could help police, firefighters and other emergency services capture intruders, and rescue hostages, fire victims or elderly people who fall in their homes by letting them know where to focus their attentions. The engineers’ system uses radio tomographic imaging (RTI) to “see”, locate and track people or objects in an area surrounded by inexpensive radio transceivers that send and receive signals. Read More

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