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Digital Cameras

Samsung Electronics seem to be busy beavers of late, with new products landing on the shelves all over the place. The latest releases, just in time for PMA09, are the TL320 and HZ15W, the former featuring a hi-tech, hi-res three-inch AMOLED screen and the latter, a class beating 10x optical zoom. Read More
Olympus has extended its digital SLR range with the unveiling of the E-620. The new addition will sit in the middle of the company's SLR line-up led by the flagship E-3 and extending through to the compact E-420. The E-620 is pitched as an "all-in-one" model that combines some of the best elements of the higher end units - like the flip-out rotating screen - with a high-degree of portability. Read More
I'm pretty sure I'm not the target market for high-end thermal imaging cameras like the VisIR 640 from Thermoteknix, but I want one anyway. I want it in the same way that I desperately wanted the X-ray specs advertised on the back of my Iron Man comics when I was 12. In this case, the object of my boyish compulsion features a 640 x 480 infrared sensor, integrated voice recorder, 1.3megapixel color camera, plus an innovative swiveling lens design which provides greater shooting flexibility, and like many examples of ex-military tech, it opens up a huge range of potential applications on civvy street. Read More
Digital Foci has released the Photo Book, a portable digital photo album in a leather-like case that lets you show off your photos and videos in a more elegant and versatile way compared with using a fiddly device like a mobile phone. The Photo Book has an 8-inch 800 x 600 LCD screen, 4GB internal memory, 2.5 hours of battery life and supports RAW format. Read More
Times are changing fast in the video industry! JVC's latest shoulder-supported pro camcorder, the GY-HM700, is the first to store files on inexpensive SDHC memory cards. Developed for mainstream production, electronic newsgathering and cinematography, the GY-HM700 records in the QuickTime (.MOV) format, the native format for Apple's Final Cut Pro™ editing system. This eliminates the time-consuming transfer step and dramatically speeds up post-production workflow. SDHC media is also the first practical solid state solution to physical archive and thanks to ever-decreasing prices, the per-minute cost of SDHC memory is now comparable to video tape. Read More
In an announcement that seems hot on the heels of Nikon's last major COOLPIX update (though five months is a long time in the digital era), the company has released details of eight new cameras due to hit shelves soon. The four Style Series, one Performance Series and three Life Series cameras all share NIKKOR lenses and EXPEED™ digital image processing along with new features such as Blink proofing, "Enhanced Face-priority Auto Focus", which can detect up to 12 faces-per-image, and an automatic scene selection function. Read More
Designed to keep up when your weekend exploits get a little rough, Panasonic's new SDR-SW21 compact camcorder is dustproof, waterproof up to 6.5 feet (in both fresh and salt water) and shockproof enough to sustain a 4-foot drop. Due for release in April at a price of around the USD$400 mark, the SDR-SW21 records to SD/SDHC Memory Cards and includes a 0.6 second quick-start recording feature. Read More
Liquid Image has seriously upgraded its range of camera scuba masks with the introduction of its HD Scuba Series. The mask gives divers a simple to operate, hands-free tool for taking 720P (1280 x 720) video at 30 frames per second (with audio) as well as 5 MP (2560 x 1920) stills. Read More
Telescopes that use computerized navigation to help stargazers find their way around the heavens have been with us for some time, but there's still a problem for the amateur astronomer - knowing where to start. The new Meade EXT-LS telescope makes this task of finding a starting reference point easy by combining a range of technologies including a built in CCD camera, magnetic sensors and GPS to automatically align itself, making it a truly "point-and-shoot" telescope. Read More
Google has become by default the gatekeeper of global information for this generation, and the company frequently takes great pains to demonstrate how seriously it takes this responsibility. In the latest of a series of moves to catalogue and present the vast amount of human knowledge and achievement it doesn't already index, Google has harnessed some wonderful technology to present some of Europe's greatest artworks in 14 thousand-megapixel resolution. Using Google Earth, you can now browse through some of the finest works in Madrid's Prado museum in detail so fine that you can see every crack in the paint and almost smell the canvas. Read More
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