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Datamatic demonstrate Remote Shutoff Valve system for water utilities

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January 23, 2008

Datamatic demonstrate Remote Shutoff Valve system for water utilities

Datamatic demonstrate Remote Shutoff Valve system for water utilities

January 24, 2008 Water utility companies waste significant labor resources each year as staff try to overcome irate customers, vicious canines and difficult to access properties in an effort to disconnect or reconnect water services. Datamatic Ltd. has developed a solution to this problem in the form of its radio-frequency operated RSV™ Remote Shutoff Valve - a system that by-passes the need for physical access to properties, thereby reducing field service costs and preventing theft from inactive services.

“RSV now makes it possible to perform shutoffs/reconnections via radio frequency, saving money and enabling utilities to redeploy field service resources into areas that will proactively improve operations and customer service. And by preventing theft from inactive services, utilities can reduce unbilled and wasted water,” said Datamatic CEO Ken Kercher.

The system can be used as a standalone or integrated into Datamatic's existing data collection platform.

Operated via a radio-frequency handheld computer, RSV’s have both disconnect and reconnect capabilities. The company argues that using system can significantly reduce field service calls, virtually wipe-out theft from inactive services and also expedite customer payment and simplify collection.

Datamatic’s RSVs can operate in both pit and non-submersible settings and are available with “Complete” or “Life Support/Trickle” shutoff options, the latter allowing a small amount of water to pass through the service (enough to drink but not enough to run appliances, sprinklers or showers as required by some local laws).

Datamatic Ltd. is demonstrating the RSV system at the DistribuTECH ’08 Exhibition in Tampa, Fla., on January 22-24, 2008.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
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