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Computers


— Computers Feature

Creative AI: Teaching computers to be reporters and storytellers

We humans are obsessed with storytelling. We tell stories to people we meet and people we love. We can't get enough of the stories that drive movies, video games, television, and books. We communicate with stories, and now we're training our computers to do the same. By writing sets of rules and instructions of varying complexity, artificial intelligence experts can enable computers to write stories both real and fictional. Some of these algorithms, as you'll see shortly, produce articles or reports with the sort of flair you'd think only a human could provide, which has fascinating implications for the future of publishing. Read More
— Computers

Historic EDSAC computer component becomes part of reconstruction

By - February 4, 2015 12 Pictures
A piece of cybernetic history returned home as a long-lost component of the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC), one of the first practical general purpose computers, was returned to Britain from the United States. The electronics chassis was given to the The National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) at Bletchley Park, where it will be used as part of the EDSAC reconstruction project and raises the possibility that more surviving parts may be recovered in the future. Read More
— Computers

New Raspberry Pi launches with 6x performance boost

By - February 2, 2015 3 Pictures
The Raspberry Pi has been responsible for kickstarting a small revolution in DIY electronics, giving amateur enthusiasts a cheap but capable mini-computer that can be turned to all kinds of tasks and projects. Today there's a new model on sale, the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B, offering a host of performance improvements over the Model B+ edition released last year. The price remains the same though, at US$35. Read More
— Computers

Interactive intent modelling gives SciNet the edge over other search engines

By - January 29, 2015
Google may be dominant in the battle of the search engines, but its ever-evolving page rank algorithm and straightforward list of results don't always get you the information you want – especially when you're not sure precisely what keywords to use. Now researchers at the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) have developed a new alternative called SciNet that uses information visualization to help you dig through related terms in narrowing down a search. Its creators claim that it outperforms conventional search user interfaces in finding information in an academic database. Read More
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