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Computers


— Computers

Google Wave - the end of email as we know it

By - July 24, 2009
E-mail has been dawdling along in much the same form since the early days of the Internet. In fact, e-mail now feels like a pretty stodgy, clunky and formal style of online communication. But hold onto your seats, because Google is about to turn e-mail on its head with the release of a revolutionary new technology called Google Wave that's due to start trickling into users' hands this September. Wave combines the strengths of e-mail with the immediacy of instant messaging and the collaborative power of social networking - and wraps that all up into a killer web application that can then be embedded into any web page or used as a private communication system. Sound complicated? It is - but you'll understand it perfectly after watching this ten-minute video. Read More
— Computers

Self-destructing online messages could save your job, your relationship, your bacon

By - July 23, 2009
If you’ve got nothing to hide there’s no need to read to any further. But if you’re worried about someone digging up something from your past – and we’re talking non-criminal here – which may influence or damage job prospects, relationships, your social or professional life, then good news is at hand. The University of Washington (UW) has developed Vanish – a prototype system that places a time limit on information uploaded to any web service through a web browser. Electronic communication sent using Vanish - such as e-mail, posts on social networking sites and chat messages - would have a brief lifetime and then self-destruct, becoming irretrievable from all websites, inboxes, outboxes, backup sites and home computers. The University says that not even the sender could retrieve them. Read More
— Computers

New software ensures no-one will ever read over your shoulder again

By - July 23, 2009
We need a name to describe that sensation you often get, in an office or out in public, that someone’s looking at your computer screen from behind you. Screen-dropping? Shoulder-surfing? Whatever it’s called, it’s annoying – and a potential security threat. Baltimore company Oculis, has developed a program that tracks an authorized reader's eyes to show only them the correct text. Anyone else looking at the screen will see only gobbledygook Read More
— Computers

Microsoft Office for Web reaches testing phase

By - July 22, 2009
In a move anticipated for some time, Microsoft has announced that the next incarnation of its ubiquitous Office software will include free web based versions of several of the suites popular applications. Although late to the party, Microsoft’s foray into online applications - which have now entered the technical preview phase - is set to put the squeeze on well established online office suite rivals like Google and Zoho. Read More
— Computers

Is this the world's most expensive (and annoying) 16GB Flash drive?

By - July 21, 2009 3 Pictures
If there’s one thing you could expect to rely on when it comes to Flash memory it’s that as capacities increase over time, prices decrease. It’s a rule that has been borne out over the years and its continuation has been a source of comfort that everything is right with the world. Now Japan’s Solid Alliance has thrown our world askew with the release of the Mnemosyne, a 16GB flash drive that is yours for the paltry sum of one million yen (approx. USD$10,000.) Read More
— Computers

Kingston DT300: the first 256GB USB Flash drive

By - July 21, 2009 4 Pictures
Remember those halcyon days when the whole world tingled with excitement as the first 8MB USB Flash drives were made commercially available? Things have certainly moved on at an incredible pace in the few short years since then, only last month Kingston announced the world's first 128GB Flash drive and already the bar has been raised with the announcement of a 256GB monster - the Kingston Data Traveler 300. Read More
— Computers

Share your point of view with the EVGA InterView 1700 Dual-Panel Display

By - July 21, 2009 4 Pictures
For users who find that one display is never enough and can’t afford the NEC CRV43, EVGA has released the InterView 1700 Dual-Monitor system. The unit consists of two side-by-side 17-inch widescreen LCD monitors suspended on a central frame, which houses a built-in 1.3MP webcam, built-in microphone, and three port USB 2.0 hub. With a supported graphics card the dual displays can be set up as a span to provide an extended desktop, or cloned to allow one display to be flipped 180 degrees for easy viewing by a second person on the opposite side of the desk. Read More
— Computers

LG's XF1 external multimedia HDD looks the part

By - July 20, 2009 3 Pictures
Those looking for a way to get movies and other digital media stored on a PC from the study onto the TV in the lounge have a few choices open to them. These include burning the content to CD or DVD, sending the content wirelessly to a media streamer or transporting the content on a USB drive. Those looking at the latter option have a new drive from LG to consider in the form of the XF1, which sports HDMI and composite outputs for direct connection to a TV. Read More
— Computers

Shhhh! Silent Keyboard EX cuts the keyboard clatter

By - July 13, 2009 4 Pictures
Writers often keep odd hours and the constant click-clack of keys on a keyboard is likely to annoy any partner within earshot trying to catch some shuteye. Such sleep deprived housemates are likely to be thankful for the Thanko Silent Keyboard EX that cuts the noise down to a mere 44.5 dB, which is 16.5 dB quieter than your average keyboard and roughly the sound level of a quiet library. Read More
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