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Chaval Response XRT Heated Gloves last longer and feature new technology

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October 5, 2012

Chaval's Response XRT heated gloves

Chaval's Response XRT heated gloves

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Like the ill-fated internet meme says, "Winter is coming" ... or at least, it is for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere. Chaval's Response XRT heated gloves are designed to help outdoorsmen battle the cold that comes with the season, using some innovative new technology – and for US$389.97, they'd better.

Chaval claims that its gloves last three times longer than any other heated gloves on the market. Having heated gloves is great, but if they die during a long trip to the wilderness, all a user has is a really expensive pair of regular gloves, and that seems counterproductive. The Response XRTs are rated to last four to seven hours, depending on how cold the conditions are.

The gloves have what Chaval calls alphaHEAT technology. Essentially, this means that there is no manual thermostat for regulating the temperature – instead, the heat level adjusts itself automatically. This allows winter adventurers to turn the gloves on and not have to worry about the temperature. This is also what allows the gloves to last longer (battery-wise) than their competitors. Chaval claims that thermostats and other electronics in other gloves waste "upwards of 50 percent of stored power."

The gloves come with a simple cable tucked inside for charging. It makes charging the gloves comparable to charging a cell phone, which should make life a little easier for adventurers. A full charge should take four to six hours.

Instead of wires, which are common in many heated gloves, the XRTs use flat, flexible, conductive traces to transmit power inside the gloves. This is designed to improve their weight and flexibility.

These gloves additionally feature some nice design ideas such as a jointed thumb for easier movement, an elastic wrist and a full gauntlet for keeping snow out of the gloves. The XRTs also have a microfiber fleece lining that adds warmth and moisture wicking.

Source: Chaval

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About the Author
Dave LeClair Dave is an avid follower of all things mobile, gaming, and any kind of new technology he can get his hands on. Ever since he first played an NES as a child, he's been an absolute tech and gaming junkie. All articles by Dave LeClair
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6 Comments

Stored power is energy. How exactly is energy wasted in a device whose function is generating heat?

readydown

@readydown: by doing something OTHER than creating heat...like processing temperature readings and turning the device on and off.

Bryan Paschke

They make fairly inexpensive backpacks that could be used as aux power for something like this. For $75 you can buy a 3000mAh backpack on Amazon. You can buy spare 7200mAh laptop batteries on Amazon for $20.

You could probably build a backpack for $200 that has enough battery power to run a lot of heated clothing and centralizing some of the battery power/electronics could allow you to make a bunch of individual heated clothing items for a much lower than typical cost and it would double as a cell phone charger.

Daishi

For $389.97, These gloves had better be made of Kevlar or have self repairing technology so that when they wear through (usually first in the fingers which quickly develop holes in most gloves I have used) they fix themselves.

Who is going to spend that much on gloves just to have to buy another expensive pair in a few weeks (or less), when they start wearing out?

Fusiontek

You should check out what VentureHeat has to offer as well. Same great looking design and performance at about half of the cost. http://www.ventureheat.com

C-Bop

That gloves looks pretty cool. During colder season it is really very important that we use gloves to keep our hands warm. Having these heated gloves is actually very nice as it can generate its own heat that would keep us warm and comfortable.

Nancy Weaver
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