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Su Rui sedan from China’s BYD can be driven by remote control

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August 23, 2012

The Su Rui can be controlled at distances of up to 10 m (33 ft) using a remote control

The Su Rui can be controlled at distances of up to 10 m (33 ft) using a remote control

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When we think of remote control cars, we generally think of scaled-down vehicles that can easily get caught up underfoot. Not so Chinese automaker BYD, which has upsized the remote control car with the release of its Su Rui model in China. The mid-size family saloon that seats five includes Remote Driving Control technology that allows the driver to get out of the car and drive it using the included remote control “key.”

Although the vehicle boasts acceleration of 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 8.9 seconds, remotely controlling the vehicle is a slightly more sedate affair. In remote control mode, the Su Rui is limited to a speed of just 2 km/h (1.2 mph) but it can be started and stopped, driven backwards and forwards and turned left and right. The air conditioner can also be started so the interior can be preheated or cooled before entry.

The Su Rui can be controlled at distances of up to 10 m (33 ft) using a remote control

But why remote control, you ask? BYD says remotely controlling the car is perfect for squeezing into parking spaces that are too tight to allow the doors to open once parked, or for bringing the car closer in windy or rainy weather. Although the shelter you’re huddling in will need to be within 10 m (33 ft) of the car due to the range of the remote control.

BYD offers the Su Rui with either a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine generating 109 hp and 145 Nm of torque coupled with a five-speed manual transmission, or a 1.5-liter turbo four cylinder producing 154 hp with 240 Nm of torque mated to a choice of a six-speed manual or six-speed Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), which comes with the remote control tech as standard.

BYD's Su Rui features a 5.1 channel 10 speaker with independent power amplifier

The vehicle also includes a Bosch 9th generation Electronic Stability Program (ESP), tire pressure monitoring system, electric park brake system, front right wheel blind spot visibility system, color reversing video surveillance system, remote control power windows, 13 types of intelligent voice reminder and 5.1 channel, 10 speaker sound system with independent power amplifier and in-car cinema.

BYD, which released its all-electric e6 late last year, has launched the Su Rui in China for a price of 65,900 yuan (approx. US$10,365) for the 1.5-liter base model, ranging up to 99,900 yuan (US$15,710) for the 1.5 turbo.

Video of the Su Rui being remotely controlled can be viewed here.

Source: BYD via CarNewsChina

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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12 Comments

I hate backing out of or into parking places. The remote control would allow my to know there is not a child behind my car when backing out in a busy parking lot. Great for tight parallel parking as well.

Pikeman
23rd August, 2012 @ 11:38 pm PDT

That price is simply too good to be true, considering what is included in the car. There must be a catch like a lack of safety gear or heavy state subsidies etc somewhere for those prices to be possible.

I also doubt whether the car would be built to last longer than about 5 years, unlike a more costly but proven Toyota.

Oztechi
24th August, 2012 @ 12:15 am PDT

re; Oztechi

Very cheap labor, no pollution control at the factory, low profit margins to create brand awareness it is conceivable that it is being done without anything overly underhanded by the government of the PRC.

Pikeman
24th August, 2012 @ 01:35 am PDT

Although it has lots of parts coppied from multiple cars and manufacturers, this car looks really nice both exterior and interior.

I don't know about the crash tests and the pollution standards, but it is a really bargain!

The feature is interesting, but it has no use in its current state I think.

The car is moving so sluggish you would get bored until you could park it properly.

bogdan
24th August, 2012 @ 04:11 am PDT

Interesting development. I guess where space is scarce the Remote Driving would come in very handy. I preferred Top Gears take on it remote controlled driving. Ungoverned full noise smash em ups with real cars.

I wonder just how easy it would be to hack into the remote. Car thieves would find a way. But then why would you steal this car if your top getaway speed is .01 kmphr

Did anyone notice the trail of oil coming from the demo car in the video? Great advertising

Gizmad
24th August, 2012 @ 02:44 pm PDT

I just watched that YouKu video from the link in the last sentence of the article.

Starting 30 seconds into the clip, one can see the ground in front of the car, and some old stains. Then, from 1:10 on as the car keeps moving, that spot becomes visible again, but now there are more spots, fresh ones, in fact a chain of spots of what looks suspiciously like oil, following the trajectory of the car. Oups!

BeWalt
24th August, 2012 @ 03:11 pm PDT

re; bogdan

How fast do you go when you pull into a tight parking place?

Slowburn
24th August, 2012 @ 03:18 pm PDT

While the oil leak is bad advertising there is no reason to suspect at this time that the problem is endemic to the manufacturer or model. But be sure to inspect the showroom floor, and check to that there is oil in the floor model before buying.

Pikeman
25th August, 2012 @ 12:36 am PDT

Sounds great for anyone wanting to drive their car off a cliff!

Louis Sayers
25th August, 2012 @ 02:34 am PDT

This should be very popular with car bombing terrorists!

Robert Veit
26th August, 2012 @ 01:38 pm PDT

Actually, it sounds like a model that would sell well in Japan as they use a lot of car lifts for parking. If the mileage is good and it meets the EPA standards and crash tests in the United States, I would not mind trying one out and possibly purchasing one.

Sonya Jones
27th August, 2012 @ 02:39 pm PDT

The feature is interesting, but it has no use in its current state I think.

The car is moving so sluggish you would get bored until you could park it properly.

bogdan

" In remote control mode, the Su Rui is limited to a speed of just 2 km/h (1.2 mph) but it can be started and stopped, driven backwards and forwards and turned left and right. The air conditioner can also be started so the interior can be preheated or cooled before entry."

" But then why would you steal this car if your top getaway speed is .01 kmphr Gizmad. (see above)

"This should be very popular with car bombing terrorists!

Robert Veit"

"Although the shelter you’re huddling in will need to be within 10 m (33 ft) of the car due to the range of the remote control." (Do you really think a bomber would want to be anywhere nearby when it goes off? If he plans to go with it, it would be better and faster while driving it directly.)

I think this would be very useful when trying to park and unpark in close quarters. (as long as there is no noticeable signal lag between commands and results.)

kellory
27th August, 2012 @ 04:01 pm PDT
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