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Turn 2D photos into 3D relief scupltures

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March 12, 2012

BumpyPhoto turns 2D photos into 3D relief sculptures

BumpyPhoto turns 2D photos into 3D relief sculptures

Image Gallery (16 images)

Those looking to bring a little more "depth" to their photos might want to check out the custom-made photo reliefs from Portland, Oregon, based BumpyPhoto. Using 3D-printing technology, the company will produce a full-color 3D relief sculpture from a 2D photo to give an even better indication of the size of that sun dial that Uncle Barry calls a nose.

The BumpyPhoto system allows users to upload a regular photo image to the company's website where some software is used to create a 3D depth map. Some human designers are also on hand to iron out any problems with the conversion, which means images with more people or objects will take longer - and cost more. Higher resolution images will obviously work better, but anything above 2-megapixels will be accepted. Users can also request a preview of the 3D depth map for approval once it's created.

The 3D depth map is then used to create the 3D relief out of a hard resin composite in a 3D printing process. Due to the additive 3D printing process, the company warns that some layering may be visible on the finished product because the 24-bit coloring added to the finished piece isn't actually painted on, but is part of the object's outer layer.

BumpyPhoto offers either a full photo, where the background remains mostly flat, or cutouts, where the background is removed. Some images will work better than others - subjects wearing glasses aren't ideal, for example - and the company specifies that only faces, full bodies, pets, cars, buildings or distinct objects will work.

The standard price for a custom-made Bumpy Photo is US$79, while a custom-made Bumpy Cutout is $89.

Some Bumpy Photo examples can be seen in the image gallery and in the video below.

Source: BumpyPhoto

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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1 Comment

The idea is interesting, but the result is kitschy... well, at least it's funny.

I also wonder how they can get correct depth data, especially for humans, where small changes on the face shape could make them quite different...

Imhof Iván
16th March, 2012 @ 07:08 pm PDT
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