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Troller readies the new T4 4x4 for Brazil's toughest roads

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June 4, 2014

The all-new T4 is ready for rough rides

The all-new T4 is ready for rough rides

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In 2012, Brazilian 4x4 manufacturer Troller, which was purchased by Ford Brazil in 2007, provided a sneak preview of what its next T4 utility vehicle would look like with its TR-X concept. It has now folded the look and feel of that concept into the new production T4, a 4x4 that is making other parts of the world beg Ford for a rebadged export.

The new T4 loses its Wrangler-like slatted grille in a dramatic front-end overhaul that leaves it looking a little more like an FJ Cruiser. The front-end design is nearly identical to the TR-X, save for a few minor alterations below the grille. That grille is set between two muscular front fenders and floating body-color bumper segments a little lower down. The new face gives it a stronger, more commanding first impression than the outgoing T4.

The front-end gets the most dramatic update

The London Gray up front can also be found on the roof, side sills, door mounts, rear bumper and tailgate, all of which provide contrast with the primary color of the composite body. The T4 loses the framed side mirrors of the TR-X design in favor of simple, tall mirrors like those on the outgoing model. It also loses the snorkel, though the high, passenger side air intake is positioned perfectly for just such an add-on. Like both the older T4 and the TR-X, the new T4 has external door hinges.

Troller stresses the off-road capabilities of the T4 without getting into all the details of its mechanical construction. The car is powered by a 3.2-liter diesel engine, which may or may not be updated from the 165-hp 3.2 equipped in the current generation model. That engine is mated to a six-speed manual transmission.

The new T4 has a more rugged, muscular look

Troller showed the new T4 over the weekend, and it should launch in the near future. It will be built in Brazil, and as nice as it'd be to have a new Wrangler/Land Rover/FJ Cruiser competitor in the United States, it appears that the T4 will be staying put in Brazil.

Source: Troller (Portugese)

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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3 Comments

I think it is really nice. It is a shame it isn't coming to the US. I think it would be popular here.

BigGoofyGuy
5th June, 2014 @ 07:18 am PDT

Not impressed with the gap between the front wing (fender in US Speak) and the bumper. On wet roads the rugged-treaded front tyres will throw water forward of the vehicle, meaning that the front end will be wreathed in spray. Not beyond the wit of Man to fit some kind of rudimentary rubber flap to prevent that.

And body-coloured bumpers? Not ideal for offroad use- or even urban driving (as, sadly, these vehicles are often used as fashion accessories by chic urbanites).

bergamot69
5th June, 2014 @ 10:07 am PDT

Amazing! The vehicle looks quite nice, BUT -

B'mot69 found time to criticise body coloured bumpers - look around you man!

80% of the cars etc. on the planet seem to have same-colour bodies and bumpers these days! The days of nice chrome bumpers that look like bumpers seem to have disappeared. They just get an extra coat of clear to make scratches show up a little less, that's all.

Or - they are made of same-colour plastic anyway!

The Skud
5th June, 2014 @ 08:22 pm PDT
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