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Bicycles

The CycleNav is paired with the user's safely-stowed smartphone

Smartphone-based navigation systems can certainly help cyclists find their way around the city, but not everyone wants to risk attaching their precious phone to their rattly handlebars, nor do they like having to repeatedly glance down to read the map on its screen. That's why Schwinn has just announced its CycleNav device. It guides cyclists using verbal cues and simple directional arrows.  Read More

Imprint Bicycle Grips are designed to ensure a custom fit

If you've ever been thundering along on your mountain bike and suddenly had one of your hands slip off the handlebar, you'll know just how "unsettling" it can be. The guys at UK-based TMR Designs certainly know, which is why they developed Imprint Bicycle Grips. Utilizing a proprietary material, they can be custom-molded to the size and shape of each of your hands.  Read More

The Magnic Light iC tail light, in place on a bike

German inventor Dirk Strothmann certainly caught some peoples' attention last year, when he released his Magnic Light touchless dynamo bike light. Instead of slowing the bicycle down by pressing on its tire, engaging magnets in its wheels, or adding friction in its hub, it's able to generate electricity simply by being close to a spinning metallic rim. Now he's about to launch the Magnic Light iC, which will offer some interesting new features.  Read More

Maria Leijerstam with her White ICE Cycle

Shortly before Christmas, we heard about 35 year-old British adventurer Maria Leijerstam's planned attempt to ride to the South Pole on a recumbent fat-tired tricycle. On December 27th at 1am GMT, she achieved that goal, becoming the first person to ever successfully cycle from the edge of the Antarctic continent to the Pole.  Read More

Maria Leijerstam is in the midst of attempting a trip to the South Pole on a custom-built ...

Last winter, polar explorer Eric Larsen attempted to become the first person to cycle to the South Pole. Continually stymied by deep, unrideable snow, Larsen fell behind schedule and was forced to abandon the attempt. This year, several others are taking up the challenge. Thirty-five year-old British adventurer Maria Leijerstam is hoping the ticket to success is a fat-tired recumbent trike built to task.  Read More

Zackees cycling gloves help enlighten drivers on cyclists' intentions

Head- and tail-lights certainly do a lot to help cyclists be seen at night, although they generally don't let motorists know which way those riders are planning on turning. That's where good ol' hand signals come in. In order to make those signals more visible, former Google software engineer Zach Vorhies has created Zackees illuminated turn signal gloves.  Read More

The SPEEDrelease hub works with regular dropouts, equipped with an adapter

For the past several decades, higher-end bicycles have utilized quick-release axles in their wheel hubs, in order to facilitate fast and easy wheel removal. With the recent movement towards disc brakes on mountain bikes, however, some manufacturers have started using a more rigid, secure thru-axle setup. Given that discs should soon be showing up on more and more road bikes, Connecticut-based Topolino Technology recently unveiled its SPEEDrelease hub, which reportedly combines the best features of both systems in one lightweight design.  Read More

BIUS1 pedals can move in and out or twist laterally, in order to accommodate the rider's l...

When we walk or run, our feet are able to land on the ground in whatever orientation makes life easiest for our hips, knees and ankles. When we're on a bike, however, our feet are at least somewhat held in place against the pedals. This can damage our leg joints, if they're forced to move in a stressful fashion. Germany's BioConform is now offering what it claims is a solution, in the form of its adaptable BIUS1 pedals.  Read More

The Hammerhead navigation system is one of the unique items that caught our eye this year ...

You like bikes? Yep, so do we. And while we certainly pay attention to the big announcements from the Shimanos and Campagnolos of the world, oftentimes it's the quirkier, more creative inventions from smaller manufacturers that really catch our interest. Keeping that in mind, here's a quick look at 10 of the products that we covered over the past 12 months, that most made us realize how much room for innovation is still left in the world of cycling.  Read More

The Copenhagen Wheel turns any bike electric

Back in 2009, MIT's SENSEable City team unveiled its Copenhagen Wheel prototype. In a nutshell, it's a self-contained electrically-powered rear bicycle wheel that can be installed on any regular bike, instantly turning it into an e-bike. Today, it was announced that a commercial version of the Copenhagen Wheel is now available to consumers.  Read More

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