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Bicycles

Bicycle historians, take note – it's time once again to look back at 10 of the bike-related products that most caught our attention over the past year! As with our lists from 2012 and 2013, these aren't necessarily things that we think are destined to be big sellers. In fact, it's entirely possible that this might be the last you hear of many of them. We like 'em, though, because they're examples of what happens when people dare to try something different ... and that sort of spirit is the reason why we're not still all riding penny farthings. Read More
Today's LED bicycle tail lights are brighter than ever, which is great when it comes to being seen by motorists. If you're riding right behind another cyclist using such a device, however, its high-intensity output can be blinding. That's why Australian cycling tech firm Augur created Wolf lights. They communicate with one another, and dim to avoid dazzling their users. Read More

Tubeless tires are pretty much standard on higher-end mountain bikes now, due to their lower weight and rolling resistance, along with their ability to contain sealant. However, they do have one drawback – you need to use a CO2 cartridge or an air compressor to put the things on. Bontrager has set out to change that, with its TLR Flash Charger pump. Read More

So-called "clipless" bicycle pedals, in which a steel cleat in the sole of the rider's shoe clicks in and out of a mechanism in the pedal, are very popular with cyclists – they maximize pedaling efficiency, plus they help keep riders' feet from accidentally slipping off the pedals when going over rough terrain. Some riders, however, find them too difficult to quickly snap out of. Additionally, they don't work well with regular, non-cleated footwear. That's why Salt Lake City-based mechanical engineer David Williams has created the MagLOCK bike pedal. Read More
Back in the 90s, a lot of mountain bikes sported handlebar end attachments – they provided the rider with more hand positions, plus they were claimed to increase leverage. Since then, bar ends have largely fallen out of favor. This has been partly because of concerns over them hooking onto things like trees, and partly just due to the whims of fashion. Now, however, a new product is attempting to bring back some of the attributes of bar ends, without their bulkiness or hooking hazards. They're called Togs, and I recently got to try a pair out. Read More
While there are plenty of add-on electric bicycle motors out there, the Rubbee takes a particularly interesting approach. The product of a successful Kickstarter campaign, it incorporates a powered polyurethane roller that rubs against the bike's rear tire (hence the name), helping to augment the rider's pedaling power by driving the wheel forward. The second version of the device is now available and it's reportedly easier to use, plus it'll take you farther. Read More
Folding and electric bikes have proven fertile ground for innovation recently, but what about bikes that are both electric and folding? Three years in the making, the Impossible bike from a team of China-based engineers folds up to fit in a backpack and is capable of reaching 12 mph (20 km/h) on the road courtesy of a brushless electric motor. Read More
Like a lot of other American products, most US-brand bicycle frames are made overseas, in countries where manufacturing costs are lower. Portland, Oregon's Circa Cycles, however, wants to build its higher-end bikes stateside, yet still sell them at reasonable prices. It plans on doing so using a unique frame-construction process, known as MABEL. Read More
Last November, Frenchman Francois Gissy hit 285 km/h (177 mph) on a rocket-powered bicycle. Now, at the Circuit Paul Ricard in the South of France, he's knocked his own world record out of the park. Dialing in a massive 4.5 kN of thrust, which generates roughly the equivalent of 560 horsepower (418 kW), Gissy took his rickety-looking rocket bike up to a monstrous 333 km/h (207 mph), hitting top speed in just 4.8 seconds and generating about 1.96 Gs worth of acceleration. We had a quick chat with Gissy, who tells us he's hoping his next run will put him over 400 km/h (249 mph) in less than two seconds on a machine he's calling the "Spine Crusher." Read More
Over its 84-year history, Pininfarina has designed breath-taking cars for the likes of Ferrari, Maserati, and Alfa Romeo. Starting in the 1980s, however, the Italian design firm began branching out into other types of products. Now, it's offering its own house-brand e-bike – the Pininfarina Fuoriserie. Read More
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