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The Next Gen Bike Rack is claimed to secure all components of a bicycle, using a single U-...

Have you ever noticed how sometimes even if there are slots available in a bike parking rack, some people will instead choose to lock their bike to a parking meter or sign post? This is because those racks aren't really conducive to securing the frame and both wheels, using a single U-lock. Montreal inventor Peter Krantz, however, has designed a rack that is.  Read More

The Morpher helmet, folded flat as a rather thick pancake

Although it's entirely possible that a bicycle helmet could save your life one day, that still doesn't change the fact that the things take up a lot of space when carried in a bag. The Morpher helmet, however, folds completely flat when not in use.  Read More

The Transport bike, with a storage 'trunk' located in the hubless front wheel

While more and more city dwellers are taking to the streets on bicycles these days, many of them still run into the same problem of how to carry things while riding. Most people will wear a backpack or attach saddle bags to their ride, but would it be easier if a bicycle had a built-in trunk instead? That's what three industrial design students wanted to find out when they made the Transport, a hubless bicycle that replaces the spokes in the front wheel with a handy storage compartment.  Read More

The Concept 1865 uses a 39-inch front wheel and 24-inch rear wheel

"What would the first pedal cycle have looked like if its 19th-century pioneers had enjoyed access to today's advanced materials?" That's the question German chemical and plastics company BASF seeks to answer with the Concept 1865 bicycle, which updates a 19th century penny-farthing bicycle design with a near full-plastic build and an electric motor.  Read More

The Lock8, in place and in use

With a regular bicycle lock, you secure it to your bike when you park, then just hope that everything will still be intact when you get back. Such is not the case with the bike-mounted Lock8, however. If anyone tries monkeying with it, a high-pitched alarm will sound, and you will be instantly notified on your smartphone. Should the thief proceed to steal the bike, you can use your phone to track its whereabouts.  Read More

An EGO-kit on an Intense Socom

Gizmag recently traveled to Austria and met up with Mario and Daniel Preining, the brother team behind the EGO-kits add-on mountain bike electric drive. We found out about the latest developments at the company, which include a faster, more powerful kit and an appearance on Austrian start-up TV competition Two Minutes, Two Million. In between torrential downpours, we took an EGO-equipped bike out, twisted the throttle and found out what motor-assisted downhill mountain biking is all about.  Read More

The barely-there Infinity Seat

Of all the complaints that cyclists have about cycling, butt pain/numbness has got to be the biggest. While it's become very common to see bike saddles with a cut-out section in the middle, that's more for relieving pressure specifically on the crotch area (you know what I'm talking about). California chiropractor and triathlete Vincent Marcel, however, has extended that cut-out to include almost the entire inside of the saddle. The result, his Infinity Seat, is said to be very easy on the bum indeed.  Read More

Modern e-bike engineering meets classic styling

Back in their earliest days, motorcycles were little more than bicycles with engines. Italian manufacturer Lampociclo is trying to bring that simple, timeless style back for the modern day e-bike market. Its bikes combine the latest technology with styling cues from a time gone by.  Read More

Double the battery, double the range

In addition to a new off-road model, German trike manufacturer HP Velotechnik plans to launch a new dual-battery option on its entire e-trike line next month. Double the battery will mean double the range.  Read More

The BitLock is a smartphone-activated bike lock

Consumers now have their choice of several smartphone-controlled door locks, which allow users to grant access to select people, and that automatically cause the door to unlock when a user approaches. San Francisco-based startup Mesh Motion has taken those same ideas, and applied them to a bicycle security device known as the BitLock.  Read More

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