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Baidu – Google's search rival in China – is making a Google Glass knockoff

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April 3, 2013

Google's competitor in China, Baidu, is reportedly making its own Google Glass competitor ...

Google's competitor in China, Baidu, is reportedly making its own Google Glass competitor (China image: Shutterstock)

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Five years ago, it was easier for a company to sneak a revolutionary tech product onto the market. Today the whole world is nervously watching. Anything that looks like it could be the next big thing attracts a crowd of copycats. Take, for example, Google Glass. Unproven though it is (not to mention months away from release), Google’s search rival in China, Baidu, is reportedly prepping its own Glass competitor.

Google does search ... Baidu does search. Google is making smart glasses ... you get the picture.

So brace yourself for Baidu Eye. It sounds like a late April Fools’ Day joke, but – for better or worse – it’s apparently all too real. According to Sina.com, the product is about as original as you’d expect. We’re talking glasses with an LCD display, voice control, image recognition, and bone-conducted audio.

Yep, we’re looking at a full-on Google Glass knockoff.

To the last detail

Baidu is currently the fifth most visited website in the world

The report’s details only accentuate the slavish copying. Using your voice to control the glasses and search the web? Check. Gesture control? Baidu totally has that too.

Baidu is apparently working with Qualcomm to extend the glasses’ battery life to 12 hours. So it sounds like Baidu Eye will sport a Qualcomm processor of some sort.

Baidu is supposedly developing the product’s software on “an open platform.” Wouldn’t it be brilliantly ironic if that open platform were a forked version of Android?

A new game

It's easy to laugh at the brazen clone job here, but Baidu probably sees the potential for a new generation of search (and advertising). Apple's breakthrough products of the last decade, the iPod, iPhone, and iPad, beat the hell out of slow-reacting competitors (see BlackBerry, Palm, Microsoft ...).

Apparently the new thing is copying the next big thing before it's too late ... and before anyone knows for sure whether it will be the next big thing.

Source: Sina.com

About the Author
Will Shanklin Will Shanklin is Gizmag's Mobile Tech Editor, and has been part of the team since 2012. Will has a Master's degree from U.C. Irvine and a Bachelor's from West Virginia University. He currently lives in New Mexico with his wife, Jessica.
  All articles by Will Shanklin
5 Comments

I believe Baidu announced about a week ago that they had asked Canonical to work with them on a modified version of Ubuntu.

professore
3rd April, 2013 @ 02:45 am PDT

Yeah because heads-up display and voice recognition are unique to Google.

Funny, I don't recall Gizmag claiming that the Apple iWatch is a ripoff of the data watches already available from Chinese and Japanese manufacturers.

Ian Gould
3rd April, 2013 @ 03:35 am PDT

I don't care about a camera, just develop some glasses that show the computer screen via bluetooth or even a wire!

Who the hell wants to risk getting their head knocked off because someone mistakenly thinks you're recording them? Especially since it's so pretentiously obvious that you have a camera next to your eye. Sheesh

Listen up, Einstein collectivists: First, come up with an eyeglass/sunglass-based computer screen to free serious users from stationary eye dedication.

Then you can do all the be-your-own-socially-avoided-bot stuff for the pretentious trendies.

machinephilosophy
3rd April, 2013 @ 02:53 pm PDT

I'll wait and see what they come up with before I declare it to be a knockoff.

Kudos to Google for the elegant design of their current prototype glasses, but they were hardly the first wearable computer maker.

Jon A.
3rd April, 2013 @ 02:56 pm PDT

isn't Google search a ripoff of Yahoo?

thepie999
3rd April, 2013 @ 06:21 pm PDT
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